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 Mystery Shopping, Merchandising & Demo
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 Starting your own merchandising business?
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AmityA
Contributor

Alvin, Texas
USA
73 Posts

Posted - 02/24/2005 :  5:19:18 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Need some feedback on this idea--

Had an owner of a feed store call me today asking if i would do a reset for them-- FYI they have been working on resetting a 32 ft mainline of dog and cat supplies for 4 weeks now and its still not finished--

He asked what i would charge and i told him i had never done merchandising privatly-- I would have to get back with him regarding pricing/pay-

Does anyone out there do merchandising like this for local companies? I have worked freelance but the resets and merchandising work was always contracted thru many different merchandising companies--

Im wondering if there is a market for something like this i mean locally--

I posted this to get feedback-- pros cons etc-- i will probably do this reset for this guy as i get most of my animal health supplies there.

Thanks in advance for ideas and thoughts guys!


Amity

Ricky_B
Member

Kentucky
USA
48 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2005 :  06:52:57 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Actually it could be a good idea. Probably how many of these merchandising companies got started. You go in, do a good job, charge them fairly and let word of mouth advertising take over. If you work it right, you could establish your own protected area. Who knows, you may have walked into a potential gold mine!!!
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.Allie B
Inactive

USA
40 Posts

Posted - 03/05/2005 :  05:43:54 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
If you did this re-set would you give us some feed-back. Sounds like a great idea.
Thanks,
allie
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Laura_In_Az
Star Contributor

Tucson, AZ
USA
286 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2005 :  8:41:24 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Assume that what you got as a contracted merchandiser is, at the least, doubled. For example: if you were getting $12/hour, assume that the company that paid you was getting $24 per hour. I've experience with demonstrators, and that's (at the least) what the up charge is.
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AmityA
Contributor

Alvin, Texas
USA
73 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2005 :  6:35:24 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Well I am going to be working this store soon-- The COOP that i originally posted about in this thread-- The manager didnt even know that companies did regular merchandising service work. He had already contraced with some big company in Atlanta and they are sending out ONE WOMAN to reset the whole store! After she leaves he wants me to come in a maintain and suggest changes. We talked for about 3 hours today and have to work out fee payment but I dont think that will be a problem. Anyway just wanted to update!

Looking forward to starting this!


Amity
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.ImBrina
Inactive

Wartburg, TN
USA
59 Posts

Posted - 03/13/2005 :  04:38:40 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Many companies will pay a referral fee to anyone who can offer a lead that signs as a client. Paragon Mystery Shopping and Mystery Shopping is a new company that will always pay a commission on all profits generated from a lead such as this. If anyone has any leads like this, please email me privately at Sabrina4Paragon@yahoo.com

Sabrina Kuder
Vice President of Operations
Paragon Merchandising & Mystery Shopping

Sabrina Kuder
VP Of Operations
Paragon Marketing & Merchandising
www.paragonmms.com
1-877-296-8300 ext 609
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CarrieK
Member

Boynton Beach, Florida
USA
33 Posts

Posted - 06/07/2005 :  6:12:28 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I have been wanting to start my own business also. i have been merchandising for about 10 years. Does anyone have any advice or places to do research on how to setup fees and how to contact potential clients?

CarrieK
Full Time Merchandiser in Florida
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ReneeWabs
Member

Marietta, Georgia
USA
22 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2006 :  08:38:54 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I would like to investigate the possibility of starting my own merchandising company. A good friend and I have been talking about how we could get started with our many years of experience in merchandising, mystery shopping and demos.

If anyone out there can point us in the right direction we would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks,
Renee'

Renee
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Elsie
Star Contributor

Camuy, Puerto Rico
USA
444 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2006 :  03:58:32 AM  Visit Elsie's Homepage  Reply  Reply with Quote
Amity, could you provide some followup from your last post? Was the person able to reset the store? (a whole store?!?! Maybe if it only had two gondolas!) Did you get the contract? Inquiring minds want to know!

Shopping Puerto Rico! I wanna merchandise too. Help!
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Nancy1
Trainee

Henrietta, New York
USA
6 Posts

Posted - 05/21/2006 :  1:16:48 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
IF you are thinking of going on your own and hireing other reps to do the work in addition to you-- you had better be able to pay the reps befor you get paid by the company. Most companies pay the merchandising companies in 30, 60 or even 90 days.
No rep you hire is going to be willing that long to be paid.
Just food for thought

Nancy L Carpenter
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JasmineGreen
Member

PA
USA
11 Posts

Posted - 09/26/2006 :  09:48:53 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Let me present my guide on "How to create your own merchandising company."

So your in the market of wanting to start your own merchandising company. You figure you can do what these other companies can do if you just only knew how to go about it.

The first step is how do you get business. Merchandising companies are no more than Consumer Product Broker companies. They are hired to increase the sales of consumer products. Plain and simple. No more, No less. If they fail at this, thier services are no longer needed.

In this business, reputation means a lot. Your reputation will determine if you spend your time getting clients or if clients end up coming to you.

So, you begin by presenting yourself as a product representative. You work hard to increase the awareness and profit of the product you represent to major retailers. At this point, you'll either sink or swim. As your reputation increasing, your contacts will increase. Eventually, if you prove yourself, you'll be working for top manufactures as an independent manufacture representative.

Since you are independent product rep and not an employee of the manufacture, your next move would be to set yourself up as a consumer goods broker. Reputation is still important here. This is how word of mouth travels. You'll need to have a few relationships built up with stores under your belt before you can be considered a consumer product broker.

Your next move would be to join NAGMR (National Association of General Merchandise Representatives). It's a well protected association and not all that apply for membership will gain access. Again, your reputation is what counts in this industry.

As your reputation increases, you'll then start selling for top manufactures like MGM/SONY and so forth. Here is where you'll need to make the decision of just how big you want to become. Because as your reputation increases, so does your client list. As your client list increases, so does the amount of work you have to do.

Finally, let say that you've spent the last 5 years building your reputation and you're known as the person who can increase DVD sales by XX percent. You've been hired to promote the sales of MGM/SONY DVD's in Rite-Aid. This account nets you 150 stores in New York. So, now you start to look for help. You've been doing this for the last 5 years so you have a good nest egg that you've saved. Your able to hire at least 2 other people to help you out on this account. The company pays you by commission on sales, lets say 30%. A DVD cost $9.99 cents. For every DVD that sales, you get $3.00.

Stay with me on this one. I'm about to show you how to make a profit.

Let say that you sell one DVD each week in all 150 stores. Your gross pay for the week is $450. You pay the two independent merchandising reps $8.00 per store vist. You agree to have them visit each store on once a week. To keep your net profits high, you determine that you would only allow each rep to have a maximum of 10 stores a week. You pay out $160 each week. That's $640 you owe the reps each month that you have the accounts. However, You don't offer any other incentives because your the rep's are independent contractors. Your net pay for the week is $290, $1160 a month. Now keep in mind that manufactures have a 30-90 policy on pay out's. So, you'll pay the reps out of your saving. You'll need at least $2000 saved. This shouldn't be hard for 5 years worth of saving.

As you can see, more than 50% of the net profit is your's for the taking at only selling one DVD a week on a commission of 30%.

*Please note that this guide is not 100% accurate for every merchandising company out there. Some companies work off a contingency fee or a flat fee. However, it gives you an idea of just how to start your own merchandising company.

Once the first 30-90 days has been reach, you'll notice that you begin to have a steady stream of profit coming into your business. No longer would you be dipping into your saving to pay reps. Now you will be able to reach into your business account to pay reps. As your reputation continues you grow, you bring more and more independent rep on to help you out with each account.

This is how it's done. This is how the company you merchandise for began it's start. You now have the know how to go out and start your own company or continue to work for independent merchandising companies. It won't be easy and it may not be exactly as this guide is written.


Jasmine
MSPA Silver Certified #be8uiw
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.Lucas at LPInStore
Inactive

Harpers Ferry, WV
USA
103 Posts

Posted - 12/21/2006 :  11:49:32 PM  Visit .Lucas at LPInStore's Homepage  Reply  Reply with Quote
Just thought I would mention - if you start you own company for anything, it is super important that you get at least Certificate of Liability Insurance, and depending on clients and chains, you may need somewhere from 1 million to 10 million USD per episode/event. It can be quite expensive if you don't have regular contracts, but is often required. You could also take the route of doing Workers Comp., but then your reps have to be employees, and you have to pay social security, etc. - which can be even more expensive.
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