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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 10/02/2014 :  4:08:30 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I am not concerned cuz I do not use them. I do get sick of listening to her complain every year. Everything this friend puts in them does not grow except for tomatoes. I guess next year she will just grow tomatoes in the tires and grow the rest in a raised bed garden.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2014 :  06:49:20 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I am in process of throwing plants away and cleaning up the garden. I am not bringing anything inside except for potted perennial hollyhocks. Next year I will grow salsa tomatoes, plum, yellow pear and cherry, jalapenos and green peppers. I have Hungarian wax peppers growing inside now. They are about 2" tall.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/05/2014 :  09:52:54 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Personally, I am happy the growing season is ending. We got our first heavy frost last night, and .50" snow the night before. WE (lol..my son actually helped!) canned up 30 qts of carrots (all pints) yesterday. All thats left are the carrots planted here at the house to process. The tomatoes are still ripening, when theres enough, Ive been making pizza sauce, tomato paste, or sauce with excess, and canning that up too.Im sure there will be a lot of green tomatoes, which Ill post online in CL to give away. There is no where to store anymore goods, my son is going to build a 20' long shelving rack floor to ceiling, along with potato and onion cribs, in the shop area that doesnt get used anyway. It will stay cold, and dark, if the door remains closed, All he has to do prior is insulate the ceiling to protect the bedroom above from the cold.Jnanne, your growing up on the farm, doesnt it make you appreciate all the work your Mother went through canning now? Just to think of the hundreds of jars, and the work involved, now makes me sympathetic to my MIL's labor of love. Makes us realize how much we took so many things for granted.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3049 Posts

Posted - 10/06/2014 :  7:47:50 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I don't remember Mother canning or freezing much. My mom, however, made wonderful jams and froze just about every vegetable or fruit that we grew. The steps are different, but the concept is the same: work hard at harvesting and processing loads of produce to keep the family fed throughout the year.

And she never did it without lots of help. I was 12 when she and Daddy married and eager to learn. My two older sisters were also very much a part of the work. I don't know who was involved after I left home, but with a total of ten kids, I am certain everyone had a job to do, from planting through weeding, suckering, hoeing, discing, de-tasseling, harvesting, cleaning, etc. We generally had a 1-2 acre garden and it was a bit of work.

Not to mention mowing, milking, feeding livestock, and all that other stuff that happened on the farm! My main duty was cooking for the family--a chore I truly love.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 10/07/2014 :  09:08:07 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
My grandma used to do canning of vegies, make pies etc. and my mother used to make pickles. Great memories..the pickles used to stink but I loved eating them.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/07/2014 :  12:26:42 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
I was a city girl and only learned some canning while in high school in HomeEC class. Then I met my husband, a farm boy, while in high school. His Mom canned everything she could grow, plus all the wild berries, and jams/jelly making. Larger families like yours, had a built in work force to help with everything.I remember my former SIL doing all the meal cooking also so MIL could be out helping FIL, or getting her own chores done. Jnanne, how is your garden doing? Are you nearing the end of growing season also?
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3049 Posts

Posted - 10/08/2014 :  05:53:04 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
The cukes finally stopped. Some of the greens we planted in the spring have reseeded and we have wonderful, fresh salads again. Tomatoes have put out new blooms, but don't know if they will actually make tomatoes. Okra is still doing a bit. Squash is gone. Peppers are petering out. Flowers are thriving.

It has gotten considerably cooler. Most days it is in the mid to upper 80's with overnight lows around 70, but about once a week the lows dip into the high 50's. This constitutes fall around these parts!

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 10/08/2014 :  05:54:54 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I used to live in Morgan City and Thibodueax (sp?). The lady that lived next door to us in Morgan City grew okra. It was a huge plant that doesn't grow here!!
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3049 Posts

Posted - 10/09/2014 :  10:13:48 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
We grew okra in IL when I was a kid--in Naperville while it was a small rural community (now it is a thriving ritzy Chicago suburb) and in several cities in Southern IL. I don't recall it producing for nearly as long as it does down here, but that pretty much goes for most garden veggies. The southern states just have a longer growing season.

Check with Burpee or a local nursery for tips on how best to grow it in your area. We always had horses, cattle, or both when I was a kid. Maybe it was the fabulous fertilizer my dad had us work in to the soil that did the trick?

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/14/2014 :  09:31:32 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
This years vegetable canning is in the books now! Ive got meat to can next, most of which will be in the form of soups, chili, and the rest will be canned in its own juice to make fast meals with, or eaten out of the jar (my son does that). Our temps up here have been in the low-high 20's overnight, and daytime temps only in the 50's. The farm garden has been plowed under, and home garden hopefully gets tilled under this coming week, IF the weather cooperates. So far, nice days have been rare, 60's temps but cold with brutal wind. I do envy you that live in the south for your longer growing season, and sure do miss getting farm fresh Georgia peaches. Hope your gardens are producing,and youve been able to get all your vegetables in without too many problems.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 10/16/2014 :  04:26:21 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I do not do canning. Good for you Judy.

I am done with the garden this year. I tore out most of the tomato plants and can bring the peppers inside. I learned my lesson this year and will never give anyone plants again. LOL.....People do not appreciate things like this.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/16/2014 :  06:14:10 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
McBarb, I know exactly where youre coming from. My neighbor had her sisters over to "landscape" the flowers they provided her. She had mentioned after how she really wanted a peony plant, so I dug up half of one of mine for her and even provided the pot so it would survive until she had the time to plant it.. That plant never saw the ground and died next to her garage! I was irate. Had I known shed never plant it, you can bet Id never have part with it. I also gave her a pond, and a beautiful huge lawn water fountain.Neither of those found a place in her yard either. She sold the fountain and the pond lays propped by a tree to this day. Her brother is a landscaper and he was going to install both, so she said. Sometimes,it just doesnt pay to be nice, does it? All the work her sisters did to make her house look nice on the outside was in vain also, as she has never pulled a weed. SAD.
Today the weather is cooperating, and like you, I am going to pull tomato,and pepper plants. The remainder of the weekend/next week is then going to be cold and windy again.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 10/19/2014 :  07:33:04 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
It is time to pick the peppers I have outside...Hungarian wax and 2 plants of Jalapenos. It is snowing! I am hoping the yellow wax peppers will get orange or red if I pick them. My jalapenos turned red after I brought them inside. Yum, yummy!!
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/19/2014 :  1:04:54 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
McBarb, did you find any good recipes to use those yellow pear tomatoes on? A friend asked if Id ever made Tomato jam, and if Id make some. While hunting online, I noticed several varieties of tomato jams and the variety of foods they can be used for. When I cleaned out the small gardens here at the house the other day, I found quite a few Roma tomatoes that were ripe, refrigerated them, and now am going to make a batch of sweet tomato jam for my friend that tried to recall how his Mother had made hers, and I found very similar online, and a spicy tomato jam for my son to use on hamburgers or crackers. I noticed what sounded like excellent recipes for your tomatoes, too. Hope the early snow isnt a sign winter will arrive early.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 10/26/2014 :  05:49:33 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy,


I used them in fresh salads, chili and tomato sauce. If you do a search, you would get more recipes. I did not use them in anything specifically for yellow pear tomatoes. They are so pretty and colorful ...they are good in anything with red tomatoes.


I do use my potting soil and seedling mixture over and over.(I mix it in with the new..) I see I have a tomato plant and a small pepper of some type growing in my pot of parsley!!! Too cute.........
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3049 Posts

Posted - 10/26/2014 :  10:24:29 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
In the past when I have had a particularly tasty tomato plant, I allow a few over-ripe ones to just fall into the soil in the hopes that I'll get some volunteer plants the following year. Sometimes I do. Sometimes not. But the volunteers are generally as tasty as the original plant.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 10/27/2014 :  04:30:22 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I had quite a few mystery plants this year. Most of them turned out to be cleomes, the pepper and tomato plant just found.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/13/2014 :  11:15:11 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Its been awhile since Ive checked this out. When I dug all the tomato plants out of the garden here at the house, I just worked all the remaining tomatoes in, and then tilled them under. It should be a very interesting spring, if what you say may happen, and we get a few extra plants than we plant. About now I wish I still had some canning to do. This cold weather really is boring.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2014 :  05:39:57 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy, plant some seeds. I have parsley, cilantro, sage and some new geraniums doing well. I planted those seeds in mid August. I plan to do more seeds so I can give plants away for Christmas gifts. Just keep them warm.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3049 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2014 :  08:13:14 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Any herbs should do well in pots in the house. Sometimes the tough part is finding the seeds for sale if you don't already have them.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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