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 Gardening: Grow your own herbs and veggies
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 02/01/2015 :  5:12:30 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I've always found Burpee to be one of the best seed companies around for veggies and for flowers.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1633 Posts

Posted - 02/02/2015 :  04:05:35 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy, what did you son get for seeds? When does he plant the seeds? Judy, I forgot to tell you .... Burpee has a garden hotline so you can call toll free and ask questions. They also replace the seed packs if they do not grow.

I am not done planting as some of the seedlings die so I plant more.

Jnanne, what seeds did you grow from Burpee? My scallions are doing wonderfully!!!!!!!! Thanks for the reminder. They were so good the last time I grew them.I have them in pots.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2015 :  1:16:43 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
You name it, we grew it. When I was a kid my dad swore by Burpee and that was all he bought for the home garden--don't know what he put in the fields. His theory of gardening was that all his kids would learn to like all veggies and learn to grow all veggies if each got a turn taking charge of each type, so with so many kids he needed lots and had enough laborers to handle up to 2 acres each summer. He rotated who grew which each season, so we each had a chance to experience different plants and take pride in different tastes. As a result most of us do love just about all veggies.

Unfortunately, I must now add all nightshade to my allergy list (I knew it would eventually happen) so I can no longer tolerate tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, or eggplant. That pretty much means the only veggies I'll be growing this coming year will be onions, squash, and zucchini. I'll leave the rest to my mother-in-law and sister-in-law.

I've reached the point in the latex allergy that I am having breathing problems when I eat any of the nightshade plants, which have a very small concentration of latex in the sap. I'm a bit bummed about it, however, am pleased that we figured out why I had to use the inhaler almost daily. Stopped eating those things and haven't needed the inhaler at all. No need for Benedryl or the Epi-pen, either, which is a very good thing.

Time to learn some new substitutions in favorite recipes!

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1633 Posts

Posted - 02/06/2015 :  3:43:27 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne, can you eat peas or beans?

I checked one of the trays I had in my room, then put in the kitchen under the gro bulb .... 3 new seeds sprouted.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 02/07/2015 :  5:24:09 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
All legumes are fine--and luckily I love them. My husband is learning to enjoy them more than he used to.

Recent tests show that my potassium is low--nightshade apparently was my major source of potassium, so I need to increase intake of the following: legumes, beets and beet greens, winter squash, carrots, halibut, tuna. I don't see growing the fish in the garden any time soon, but maybe the veggies will show up next season.

There are lots of other plants that are high in potassium, but most of those are also high in latex. But, during the weeks since I've quit eating nightshade my breathing is so much better. What an easy fix for asthma! And I've always enjoyed learning new ways to cook.

Last night I made a chicken curry using canned pumpkin as the base. It turned out very well. I missed the zing of the peppers, but the texture and taste were still very nice. My husband has requested spaghetti sauce with pumpkin. I think it may be just to encourage me to keep at it, but maybe he's being brave and experimental in his gourmet tastes?

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1633 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2015 :  08:24:46 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne, growing fish in the garden?? too funny!!!

I have grown beets, beans, peas and carrots... they are fun and easy to grow. There are so many varieties of beans and peas. I am amazed. I like the pole variety of beans and peas the best.
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HeatherP
Star Contributor

AZ
USA
368 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2015 :  12:54:17 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I have seen some cool experimental hydroponic gardens that have fish living in the water!

Heather
Silver Certified Shopper
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 02/10/2015 :  11:19:30 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
McBarb, my son was mistaken when he said hed ordered everything from Burpee. There is a 15" long box full of seed from Gurnee's, along with a shorter box from Burpee, and theres 2-3 different varieties of each including radishes, carrots, tomatoes, sweet corn and baby corn, honeydew melon, cantaloupe,along with bush beans, dill, winter squash, cucumbers, green peppers,jalapeno, hot peppers,etc. Hes got seed for a German Radish that grows to almost golf ball size that we especially like, plus, 3 other smaller varieties. Hes planting 4 different kinds of potatoes and also onions. Hes got early and late sweet corn. All I can hope is that everything doesnt come at the same time, or Ill be going nuts with too much canning, that I wont be able to keep up with even with two pressure canners, or that he intends to sell a LOT of it. Since we didnt get any pears from last years crop, this year is surely to be a bumper crop, as thats the way it goes. Of course, they have to be canned. He bought a planter from the home improvement store that marks the rows, and plants at the same time, that he hopes will save our backs. Of course, there will still be some seed that well have to be on our knees to plant. The green peppers and jalapenos are now sprouted and about an inch tall with a couple of leaves. Hes got the soil temp at 79-83 degrees.He bought a digital thermometer that reads the soil temp, just aim the gun and it reads it. Using those disk pods I spoke of earlier are doing a fine job. Not requiring a lot of water, and moist to the touch.Spring seems a long way off today as were getting snow now.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1633 Posts

Posted - 02/11/2015 :  08:42:02 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I got a catalog from Gurney and I want to order some winterized gladiola bulbs. They do not freeze and last thru the winter so I do not have to dig the bulbs up. Yippee.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 02/11/2015 :  11:58:29 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Now that my kind of gardening McBarb. Plant it and forget about it, other than to water it. as much as I like flowers, I just dont have the patience to weed. Glads are beautiful, I hope you have good luck growing them.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1633 Posts

Posted - 02/11/2015 :  4:23:06 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I never realized how easy it was to grow gorgeous flowers with bulbs but when it comes to digging them up..that is not for me. I need to find bulbs like the winterized glads or find out which type of bulbs do not have to be removed. My friend has lillies that she leaves in the ground. I may find some other goodies in Gurneys catalog.

Does your son buy from them often or is this his first time?
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2015 :  07:59:27 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Last year Kurt purchased all of his seed locally for the garden. Then a friend asked if hed be interested in some sweet corn free. It was this friend that had beautiful corn that advised Kurt to order from Burpee, Gurney, or Jungs. What a huge difference in seed quality. Local sold seed had a lot of broken seed and dust, whereas the seed from the other three were clean as a whistle, and all in one piece.
Have your Glads started to come up yet? What are you going to do if they grow to full height? Ive noticed my neighbors grow tall, and then lean over due to the weight. Theyre a beautiful flower, thats for sure.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1633 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2015 :  2:50:56 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I took the glad bulbs from last summer and put them in the box for now. I have none planted at the moment. Yes Judy, they are beautiful!!!!
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1633 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2015 :  3:57:51 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy, I sent you an email.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2015 :  4:05:14 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I plant bulbs every year. My ten-year plan envisions lots of glorious blooms from early spring through late fall, and I am so looking forward to each new season to see what comes up, how they have spread, and where the holes are that need to be filled.

Most bulbs can make it through the winter--just read up on them to be certain they will work well for your zone. My grandmother always dug up her glads, canna, calla lilies, and dahlias. She lived in east central IL where the winters were just too cold for them. Down here in Louisiana all of those plants go in the ground and stay out year round. I love not having to dig them up each fall.

In the northern states you can put in hosta, tulips, iris, daffodils/jonquils, anemone, crocus, day lillies, tiger lilies, and Easter lilies and leave them for years before they become overcrowded and need to be dug up and thinned out. They can take the cold of the winter months.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2015 :  09:10:55 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
McBarb, I didnt receive it. I checked the junk mail too.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2015 :  2:08:13 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne, you spoke of hostas, do you have many in your gardens? From what you have written in previous postings, you must be kept very busy tending to your flowers. Ive got a few daylilies planted around the base of the house, and theyre alive and blooming only because theyre very hardy. Kurt always takes the weedeater after the weeds and clips the daylilies off on occasion. When I bought the house there were a ton of them, and also a plant that has small white wedding bell shaped flowers that I cant think of the name of, but those would pop up outside of their borders, and I finally dug 99% out, and gave away. Now, all I have are two rare, dont know their names,alternating variety hostas across the front of the house. Theyve both got huge ears, one lighter green with deep wrinkling, the other a very dark green with deep wrinkled ears. Ive had them a few years, and theyre finally starting to look nice and full. Really no care to them, other than fresh bark every year. Can you tell Im NOT a flower gardener? lol
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2015 :  8:25:16 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy--the nice thing about bulbs is that they take very little care at all. I try to plant where grass refuses to grow, so weeding is minimal. I move perennial "weeds" like violets and shamrocks from the yard into shady areas so they spread and bloom longer and take over bare spots, choking out what I consider to be weeds. So, for the most part, once I've planted and established a bed, there's very little maintenance.

The hardest part is convincing my mother-in-law to give my "weeds" a chance to prove that they can be pretty if left to grow. She's become a reluctant believer, if not an active supporter, so we've compromised on those. I keep them within the fenced portion of the yard so the neighbors are not scandalized by my non-traditional ideas. She gets to keep the outside of the fence more orderly--except for one section that is all wild and all mine, full of monkey grass and bulbs.

As for the hosta, this house actually had several varieties in place when we bought the property. I don't know the names of any of them, but they are all very full and pretty--some bloom white and some purple, leaves spotted or striped or plain, dark or light, ruffled or smooth, round and bulbous or long and slender. Looks like they've been around for several years.

I used to have some from my grandmother's house that I took with me from place to place for years. Some of that hosta plant has been spread all over the country! I'd just dig up a starter piece whenever I moved and replant at the new home. I'll have to get some from a cousin now that I've finally settled in my "final resting place."

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1633 Posts

Posted - 02/14/2015 :  05:13:11 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy, I clicked n email poster here. If you do not use that you wouldn't get it. I wanted to send you pics of the glads and flowers I had last year.

Of all the seeds I plant I think peppers are the easiest vegetable to grow.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 02/14/2015 :  09:32:55 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
McBarb, I wasnt aware one could email within the site, and dont know how to retrieve your message. The emails I have received from other posters in the past had always come directly to my personal email site.
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