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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2015 :  05:46:53 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
I asked Kurt, he doesnt know either as his friend wouldnt tell him. His friend gave him a large unmarked bag of it to spread in the garden. He said it was safe. I suppose he didnt give much info because of his being in the business to rid rodents, and as we know most of that stuff is top secret, right?
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1634 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2015 :  07:21:03 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Strange... you say top secret as that stuff is always selling in stores. Unmarked bag? I doubt it Judy but you can keep it to yourself. I would never use anything if I did not know what it was. They use a lot of chemicals in stuff like that. I paid $23 + to get organic pellets to put on to keep slugs away. It is Whitney Farms slug and snail killer. Works great and all it does... is it dries out the slugs and they die. ORGANIC!!!!!!!!! woohoo and I got it at the hardware store.
Judy, good luck with the strawberries. chipmunks and your secret stuff!!
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 03/08/2015 :  08:55:53 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
I should rephrase that. The bag is unmarked because the stuff is in a thick unmarked paper bag. IF I knew what the stuff was Id definitely pass it on, but Kurt said he wasnt told the name of it, just that it works great. Even though this is a friend, around here companies dont want customers to know or like you say, theyll go to the store and purchase it, which then causes them to lose business. When Kurt put in the new lawn a couple years ago, he also bought seed from this same guy, which Kurt was told was the "best". When it came up, it was greener than any weve ever used, but so full of weeds it looked horrible in the fall.( It looked like it was full of crab grass) It was the first to die off, and in the spring the last to turn green again. Kurt ended up discing the yard up and replanted it with a name brand seed purchased at the hardware store. Dont you know, men seem to believe anything their friends say is gospel...lol.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2015 :  2:40:27 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Decades ago when DDT was legal my uncle sold it. He dug a trench around his house and poured it all around the foundation, then covered it over. To this day there has not been an insect or spider seen in the home. I wonder how many more decades that will remain true for the property.

I also wonder how that has affected the ground water in the neighborhood.

Even when they know what they are putting in their yards, our menfolk are still at the mercy of the available info regarding the product. At that time the average citizen thought DDT was a great product. Our children and grandchildren, etc. will be living with the aftermath of that for a long time. As they will with so many other products that have turned out to be not so wonderful as first believed.

(Hard to believe I am usually the Pollyanna in the crowd, isn't it?)

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2015 :  1:48:32 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Since I dont own the property any longer, its useless to try and talk to Kurt about anything he chooses to use, or do on HIS property. If I open my mouth, hell immediately shut it up, if he doesnt agree. From what he said the other night, he is now going to plant all the strawberry plants in the back yard here at the house. If thats the case, we shall see how nice his yard looks once the moles, and chipmunks get wind of strawberries growing.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 03/11/2015 :  5:50:39 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
My grandmother grew the most wonderful strawberries when I was a kid. The patch got just a bit bigger every year and the berries were so sweet. I don't recall any trouble with rodents, but she probably had her own way of dealing with them. With the farm surrounded by corn or soybeans every year, I can't imagine there were none to be found.

They did have groundhogs under the outhouse that Grandpa dealt with for several years. I think he liked to mutter about them more than he cared to actually deal with them. They were more fun to complain about than they were an actual nuisance. Now, if they had been in the grain bins, that would have been a different story.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 03/12/2015 :  05:24:48 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne, having the strawberries spread out is just what I mentioned to Kurt. Personally, I thought 80 plants was too many to buy, dont you? This whole lot including the house, and a huge 6-car garage is only an acre. Im afraid by next year he may have more plants than he wished for once they start bearing fruit, stringers, and the work. IF he thinks Im going to be out there picking constantly, he has another thought coming! My days of being the energy bunny change each year as my batteries are running low. Im sure, you know better than I how much work this is all going to be, since youve experienced it firsthand growing up.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 04/05/2015 :  6:10:41 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Early Superior potatoes, onions, and more garlic got planted out at the farm today. The plants in the basement are growing fast now, and will be good sized by the time they go outside to be planted. The strawberries that were ordered will be shipped at the end of the month, as well as the blueberry plants.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 04/06/2015 :  11:08:31 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy--maybe in a year or two he can start a Pick-your-own business? Plant some asparagus, a few more berries--blueberries, gooseberries, etc. and some other perennials and all he'll have to do is weed, hoe, and collect the cash? 80 strawberry plants is a good start!

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 04/06/2015 :  1:32:48 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnane, Kurt planted a lot of asparagus here at the house last year, so well hopefully get to enjoy it this yr. My next to the oldest son always had a huge garden and had lots of asparagus, and said wed have to check it at least twice a day, as it grows so fast. With Kurts back problems, I dont see him wanting to have to pull weeds! He was in a motorcycle accident many years ago, broke his back, and is a walking paraplegic, although you wouldnt know he has any problems, unless he over does something, then I can see it in his stride.He walks like one leg is shorter than the other. His back gives him a LOT of grief though. Everything he has planted, he has come up with ways to lessen his having to get on the ground to weed, hoe, or harvest. Thats why he purchased the two big lawn tractors last year. Hes made, or purchased add-on equipment that does most of the work for him,except pick tomatoes and string beans that would require a lot of time spent kneeling or on knees. As for a pick your own garden, I really think he wants to be a corn and soy bean grower. His Father has all the machinery and land that Kurt will inherit as he is the only one interested in it.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 04/14/2015 :  8:30:13 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I am so excited watching my irises bloom for the first time. White, yellow, lavender, purple. Funny, the ones I bought were all supposed to be purple--I planted them next to the yellow daffodils so the neighbors could enjoy the purple and gold colors (we are in LSU Tiger country, now) and the Louisiana Iris I picked up at a garage sale are all deep purple. Where did the other colors come from? I think that package at Sams Club was mismarked! But they sure are pretty, and I really don't mind.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 04/15/2015 :  12:22:27 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Just reading about the many flowers you grow, I can imagine your gardens are very bright and pretty. Ill bet your neighbors love seeing the wide variety of plants, and colors. No one in my neighborhood really grows flowers, although, the couple across the street made a memorial garden in a small wooded piece of land between his home, and the unsold newly constructed home next to his, in memory of his wife's Mother, and now enlarged to memorialize his Mothers recent passing. Last year, it attracted a lot of butterflies that we havent seen for several years, and this year he is adding a short pathway into the woods where hell line the path with a variety of flowers,shrubs, and solar lights for all to enjoy. He has a green thumb, and loves lots of color like you Jnanne.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 04/16/2015 :  6:14:48 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Well, as we are only at the beginning of year 3 on the 10-year plan, the blooms are still pretty sparse. I am lazy and don't want to dig up and thin the bulbs until I absolutely have to, so I didn't put very many in any one spot. Mostly I have vast spaces of Monkey Grass, wild American Violets, and Shamrocks with bulbs popping up among the greenery--and of course all 3 of those plants bloom for a while throughout the spring-fall. The Shamrocks tend to disappear when the summer heat hits, except in the deep shade, and then the leaves get huge. Those are truly fabulous plants by the end of the fall.

I guess I could babble on for a long time about my babies...

I've got my eye out for hyacinth this year. I sure hope I come across someone thinning beds and can get a bunch at a garage sale, but I expect that Sam's Club or a nursery is a better bet. I love the scent of hyacinth.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2015 :  09:13:32 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Hyacinths have the most wonderful fragrance of any flower I can think of. Addicting! During the sales before Easter up here is the time to get them, and then after the holiday on clearance. I thought they were just an ornamental plant sold for the holiday, but you say gardeners in your area grow them. If I passed a home that had a lot of them growing,of course, up here it would be unusual, I know Id be stuck there all day just enjoying the fragrance. Theyre really a pretty plant. Were finally enjoying some spring like temperatures. And AGAIN, the tomato plants Kurt planted from seed are growing like weeds, tall and spindly, just like last spring that I complained about. He even started them a month later than last yr.My dining area faces the south and gets sun all day long. The morning after Kurt brought them upstairs they grew a good inch, and have done so daily. The whole south wall is windows, and set with long tables to hold the plants that were ready to come up from basement, giving him room now under the grow lights to start other veggies. The strawberry and blueberry plants are to arrive between the 23rd and 27th of this month. He tilled the area last night he plans on planting them.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 04/17/2015 :  3:43:55 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I love Lilacs as much as Hyacinth, but there is no room in my yard for another large shrub. Lilacs smell so wonderful.

Have you contacted your local experts to get tips about the tomatoes? Maybe your soil needs a nutrient? Try planting carrots next to them. The two veggies each put nutrients into the soil that the other needs, making them perfect growing partners. That may help.

Having your soil tested may help, also.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 04/18/2015 :  07:09:24 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
The plants are in the ground yet due to the low temps yet, and chance of frost until the end of May. Remember last year when I had this same complaint right up until they did go in the ground? Once planted, they transformed into beautiful bushes with more tomatoes on them than Id ever gotten from planting smaller plants. It just amazes me that in the house they have grown just so fast, and tall as last year, even though started a month later. Here at the house, the area used for planting is too small to include carrots along with the tomatoes plants. The area next to the house is no larger than 6'at its widest, narrowing to 4 1/2', then its 11-12' long with no room to expand it, as its bordered by a cement patio, and cement step and curb to the driveway. On the farm Kurt does plant them next to his 4 varieties of carrots. Of course, last year we lost all the tomato plants due to that juglon disease. Over the winter months Kurt cut down, removed the trunks, and root system of 12 huge walnut trees, all either along the fence line, and in the area he is expanding the garden.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 05/04/2015 :  06:19:00 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
The Strawberry, and Blueberry plants arrived the 24th and are in the ground now. They already have leaves on them since planting. The blueberry plants came in small 4" pots, and those too, are in the garden. Kurt ordered 6 more but of a different variety that havent arrived yet. Tomatoes,romas, cherry tomatoes, peppers,jalapenos were moved outside onto tables now, with soon to follow cauliflower, broccoli,and head lettuce. I was talking to my x-husbands wife about the garden size, and she said they had to laugh, because they knew who is going to get stuck with all the work when it comes to canning/freezing the goods.
Also, I wanted to pass on to you and McBarb an article I read on msn.com titled, How to: Grow Fresh Produce from your leftover Groceries by Bob Vila, that to me sounded like a great idea. The article explained the many veggies we purchase at farmers markets that we can grow from the core/seed we generally discard (celery, wrinkled up potatoes with eyes, ginger, onions, basil, garlic,lettuce, tomatoes etc.)and grow in pots, or transplant in our gardens once large enough. From what I gather, McBarb likes to experiment growing things in pots, which I thought might interest her. Although, the article discouraged using grocery store purchased veggies due to it being treated and chilled to prevent growth, we know some things can be as others have been successful doing so.
Our lilacs, pear, apple trees, and flowering crab trees are all in blossom now. I was up at 5AM yesterday morning, and only saw colorful buds,but by mid-morning, early afternoon full blossoms were in full swing with a variety of fragrances in the yard. I love spring! The trees and shrubs are all nice and green with leaves, what a sight.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1634 Posts

Posted - 05/09/2015 :  09:59:23 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I grew a granny smith apple once from a seed that had sprouted inside the apple. When I cut it open I saw the sprouted seed and immediately put it in dirt and it grew!!

I emailed Burpee about the 3 packs of hollyhocks that did not grow. I sent them pics of the front and back of the packages in question. I was told they do not refund or replace packs from a previous year but "as a courtesy" they would send me some free seeds. I asked what kind and she told me tomatoes and peppers. I received "Tasti Lee" hybrid ( 6 oz. red) tomatoes... "Sun Gold" hybrid (golden orange cherry sized grows in clusters!) tomatoes... and last but not least is "Candy Apple" hybrid (5" red) peppers."
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1634 Posts

Posted - 05/09/2015 :  10:09:42 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Tasti Lee has 40% more lycopene than other tomatoes. I think Burpee is so awesome to deal with!!!!! Getting those seeds made my day.

I haven't been around much as I have been at a free campsite EVERY chance I get. I have cooked hot dogs, seen pileated woodpeckers, wildflowers growing, cooked cheeseburgers, had great fires and a sunburn. I got about 30 trees and dragged them through the woods, piled them in a place so no no one driving by would see the wonderful wood pile I got. I bought a saw and went to town, cutting the trees up and burning them!!!!! Goodness, I heard owls, loons and saw some trylium budded. This is the time of year we have to get to the free campsites...there are no bugs and no tourists!!
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 05/10/2015 :  07:29:36 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Your northern-ness is showing in that post. I remember the days of no insects! I think I heard on the news the other day that a little girl was saved from being carried off by a mosquito a couple of miles from here.

My iris are all gone for now. The day lilies and Easter lilies are finally coming up and looking like some may bloom this year. Don't know what took the Easter lilies so long. Only a couple of daffodils showed their faces. Got greenery but no buds. Maybe next year.

My mother-in-law wants to move the weeping peach to the back yard. It isn't thriving as much as she expected, so she wants to replace it with wisteria that she plans to train to grow into a fountain shape. It can be done, but it takes diligence in pruning to keep them under control down here. They are gorgeous and they grow almost as quickly as Kudzu--considered an invasive species by many. On my ten-year plan this could end up covering the house and all the century-old oaks in no time! I've been reading up on the plant. It can grow up to ten feet per season, but could take 6-7 years before it blooms. Pruning increases the chance of blooming and makes the blossoms bigger. Maybe this will keep her busy and she'll stop butchering the crepe myrtles!

Jnanne
Silver certified
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