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 Gardening: Grow your own herbs and veggies
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2015 :  12:20:00 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I do not want to spend the money for all of the ingredients to make cornbread so I would prolly use the Jiffy Mix recipe. I can get boxes of Jiffy Mix at Aldi's for $.49 each.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3047 Posts

Posted - 07/21/2015 :  06:05:17 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I'm here--just been a lot going on this summer.

If you leave the seeds in the jalapenos they will be hotter. The capsasin makes the hot sensation, and it is in the oil. Most of the oil is in the seeds.

My family likes peppers stuffed with a combo of cottage cheese, romano, feta, parmesan, and spinach--with whatever herbs I decide to toss in. I don't have a recipe--just use what we have in the fridge, cabinet, and herb garden. Instead of using a breading, I put the peppers in the broiler to singe the skin, them remove it. I let them cool enough that I can safely slide the skin off, stuff the peppers, and bake in a hot oven (375-425f), keeping an eye on them so they don't burn, for about 20 minutes. This works for any kind of pepper you feel like using, from the smaller jalapeno and chile to the larger banana and relleno. I've never used a bell pepper this way, but I don't see why you couldn't.

And I freeze chiles and jalapenos whole and uncooked. Just wash, cut off the stem, and lay them out to dry so they don't stick together. Then when I want to use some to season a cooked dish or even to spice up pico de gallo, I just pull what I need out of the bag.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/21/2015 :  06:24:44 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
McBarb, its totally understandable to use Jiffy mixes when baking for one person. If it were for just me, Id be doing the same most likely. At times, I find making a whole recipe of something is too much, and then it goes to waste.
Good to hear from you again Jnanne.Hope youre doing well.Weve missed you.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 07/21/2015 :  07:58:15 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Yay, Jnanne posted. Thanks for the tips!!!!!

Judy, I get recipes from Food network daily. I do not recall how I signed up. I think I went to the website and signed up from there.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/21/2015 :  5:04:26 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Thats what I did also. I also like the website epicurious for recipes. We get tired of the same- o same-o foods all the time, so its fun to try someone elses.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/26/2015 :  2:06:31 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
the garden has begun to kick out cauliflower and broccoli like crazy, along with cucumbers. Ive been busy freezing the broc/cauliflower, and making pickles. Sure is nice not to have to buy a lot at the store for making pickles other than the spices, as onions, garlic, and dill planted are coming very handy this year. Kurt dug up a few hills of potatoes that produced small potatoes due to the juglon infected soil.The majority are fingerlings, with out scattered nice sized.The potatoes must have grown to a certain point and were stunted. Whatever, the fingerlings were fantastic sauteed for supper last night, along with fresh broc/cauliflower mix to go with meal.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2015 :  12:34:54 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy, I want some too.

Actually, I logged in to say I called Burpee about what my friends have been telling me for months. He said if you smoke cigs or any tobacco product and touch leaves on a pepper plant, you will not have peppers. I thought maybe he had too much to drink but after calling Burpee, I did verify this info. If you smoke do not touch tomatoes or pepper plants, as they may get mosaic disease ...there is nothing you can do for this once the plant has it.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/28/2015 :  06:00:52 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Who would have thought? Very good information. I dont know why anyone would have to touch the plant other than to initially plant it though. Evidently, thats all it takes. I mentioned in a past comment that Kurt transplanted several tomato plants that looked as though they were dying off. Well, now there are huge tomatoes on those plants, so not all was lost. Once he removed the plants he removed as much dirt from the root system as possible. We arent going to have a huge crop, but anything is better than nothing. Last night, I froze up a couple of packages of baby corn to be used in stir fry, and a home made chicken fried rice that I use a variety of rice in. Kurt, and the dog absolutely love the stuff. The dog gets all crazy when she smells it cooking, and dances in circles and barks/whines. Craziest thing Ive ever seen. She loves all vegetables and doesnt leave a speck. I dont add any seasonings to it as Kurt smothers it with soy sauce, and the dog doesnt need it. Making more pickles today.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 07/28/2015 :  10:44:49 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I am glad you got some tomatoes!!
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 07/28/2015 :  12:23:55 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I checked my plants today and the 1 sungold has 2 sets of buds now and the sweet hybrid mix pepper is going to flower very soon. The jalapenos are still growing and spreading out so if I repot them, they will have 8 - 10 groups of peppers on each plant. Sweet!!~
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 07/30/2015 :  08:17:39 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy, I just saw the weather thread and you should read what Jnanne posted. Now I know why she isn't here.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/31/2015 :  06:40:43 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
I made a trip out to the farm garden yesterday to pick string beans to share with my neighbors, and was totally shocked at its appearance and lack of veggies! As I mentioned in a prior post, tomatoes were going to be few, but I didnt realize how little would be gotten. This is going to be a very low producing garden this year, so not much for canning at all. I think the most Ill have to can this year will be the pears, and apples which have produced heavily.But that garden looks absolutely sad. Im not even sure there will be enough dill to finish making pickles, which the cucumbers are really slow at producing this year. The garlic didnt produce as well as thought. Sweet corn isnt amounting to much because of the second high wind storm took care of anything we thought would make it. Forget the tomatoes, possibly only a few to eat. So far, even the potatoes dug up arent of any great size, mostly fingerlings, with some potatoes roughly 4-5" long. Well never make it through the winter with this low amount of produce. Onions are doing very well, as are the baby corn, squash, and broccoli. Even the garden here at the house isnt good. The tomato plants are short with nothing of any size to speak of, with very small fruit. Yet, the cherry tomatoes are doing exceptionally well. Kurt is disheartened, and blames his tilling the soil too much by bringing more juglon infected soil to the surface, thus affecting the growth of the plants, and low producing. Im not sure what his plans are for next year. He did say he was going to move the garden, but that means even more work clearing an area. We shall see.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 07/31/2015 :  7:00:49 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy, I heard that planting soy beans will make the soil good again. I see many farmers doing that around here. Sorry about the garden not being so good. I hear you!! I know you are thankful for what you do have tho. I would get some cow manure too and put that in the soil...treat your soil, this fall for next year. Right?
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 08/01/2015 :  07:21:30 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Thanks for that info, I will ask my X-hubby about that.Possibly he would know where manure can be gotten. Up until my former FIL passed away the farm had dairy cows, along with all the farms in the area. Today, the cows are all gone, and cash crops are grown instead. I remember my former MIL always having manure put on the garden every spring. I just wonder if planting soy beans would rid the soil of that juglon from the Black Walnut trees, or if the dead rotting roots from the trees are going to have to be removed. Again, Ill have to ask the X. As you said, possibly planting soy beans in there might help, and since he does plant them on a good many acres, it wouldnt hurt to try it. Have to see what he says. Thanks for the tip.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 08/01/2015 :  07:46:59 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/HO/HO-193.pdf

Judy, try a search for rid juglon and also contact the cooperative extension of your local community. I saw many articles on even how to use the soil to get rid of plants you do not want. Good luck!! I do recommend you do this in the fall for next year. Hey, it may be fun to grow soybeans and then you can use them for something.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 08/03/2015 :  06:35:29 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Like you, I too have read many articles about juglone caused by black walnut trees, and the majority say it is impossible to rid the soil of it depending on the type of soil it is. The farm has clay soil, which is good in many instances for growing, but not for ridding juglone. The trees were huge, and with many years of producing dead leaves, and walnuts that were never picked up worked their way into the soil. The garden space used hadnt been used for years so wasnt kept up. Kurt talked to his Dad who farms the land, and he said to plant rye which will kill the weeds,and replace nutrients lost over the years. Whether that will help the soil rid juglone is questionable, because so far we havent been able to find anything online that suggests so. Kurt also has been doing a lot of researching this, and other ways to fix the problem. The article you suggested really didnt offer anything new that was helpful. So far the best advice is to move the garden to a different area, which I dont think is possible as my X plants corn, and soy beans on every acre. I mentioned to Kurt he might be wise to plant the garden here at the house, but that was instantly responded to with, NO way. I think the next step is for Kurt to go to the county extension office for advice. Im thinking this years canning is about done! The pickings have been very small, and not enough to even bother trying to can. Kurt brought home a bag of sweet corn last night to be froze, and also possibly 2 quarts worth of cucumbers, all little gherkin sized Im not touching. In any case, Thank you for your researching this, and advice.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 08/03/2015 :  10:54:53 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I am sorry to hear this, but maybe the cooperative extension can help.... and maybe not.

I repotted my huge jalapeno plants and I was surprised they were so root bound. I knew they were root bound cuz the ends of the leaves were curling over. I also have to transplant the tasti lee and sun gold tomatoes along with the other pepper plants. I guess it is possible to grow veggies inside but I am not expecting them to grow as large as they do outside. I will be happy if I get any.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 08/04/2015 :  05:49:58 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
It is really too bad your landlord doesnt let you plant a few things outside in a small area for as much as you love to garden. It seems as though you are always trying something different to plant.
Speaking of jalapenos, I made up 42 jalapeno poppers, delicious! I made so many thinking Kurt would take some to work to share. Instead, he said hes going to eat them himself. I ate about 8 halves, and then had to be digging in the fridge for more as they ARE addicting. Ive got two ice cream pails full of huge jalapenos, plus sweet corn to freeze up. Some of that sweet corn that blew down actually has half ear developed corn cobs. The baby corn did pretty good, although, Kurt waited too long to pick some of it, and it got much larger than desired for use in stir fry. Those I threw out for the wild animals. Because baby corn is so small, once you pick the cob off the plant, another grows in a few weeks. theyre just as sweet,tender,and tasty as can be for something so small (2-3" long). The nice part, you dont have to remove the corn from the cob, you eat the whole thing. It wont be long and the carrots will be ready to pick, and there are a lot of them pf different varieties small, to long.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 08/04/2015 :  07:42:49 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I had a raised bed garden last year but the neighbors are feeding the squirrels and everyone was helping themselves to my veggies. I only have morning glories outside now and they are in a hanging basket. The 2 plants (morning glories) in the ground are not seeds I planted. I have no idea where they came from, but they are growing ok. So far, the squirrels have not messed with anything besides I found 3 whole peanuts they buried in the dirt I left in the ground from last year's raised bed garden. I removed the dirt from last year's raised garden and put it in storage containers. Now I have to bake it to sterilize it so I can use it again.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 08/05/2015 :  09:41:40 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
I remember now your telling us about the neighbors helping themselves to your vegetables. This is something I also thought of in regard to the strawberry plants here at the house. I would have to bet that next summers crop will be effected once neighbors notice all the red berries from the road, and decide to come back after dark to help themselves. Hopefully, theyll be deterred as Kurt installed flood lights at different points on the garage that have sensors that will automatically flood the whole backyard with light when there is movement. He also installed a wireless alarm system along the perimeter that notifies us of an intruder/visitor. Our driveway is quite long, and visitors are not alway heard approaching, so this works. Living in town is nice, but intruders arent.
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