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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/11/2015 :  6:16:34 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Ill bet, youll savor every last bite of that single jalapeno in some favorite dish for dinner one day.
Our local grocery store had a two day sale on chicken quarters. Ten pound bag for $3.80 I havent seen chicken that cheap in years. I purchased 3 bags early yesterday morning, as did each of my sons. So far, Ive canned up 6 bags. Just 30# left to go! Sure am happy Kurt bought a lot of metal lids, as I havent gotten to the rest of the apples and pears. Priorities changed in an instant.
Evidently, Libby's the company that makes pumpkin pie filling up here, is having a difficult year growing pumpkins to make the filling, which will result in high prices at the grocer. I did a bit of research online, and found that buttercup and butternut squash make fantastic pumpkin pie. Luckily I have a ton of it canned up that we wouldnt eat otherwise, so all I have to do is puree it, add the spices, etc., to make my pies this year, and for quite awhile.Here, Ive been adding a couple of quarts to the mix for home made dog food. Thats going to stop until I try the pies.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1634 Posts

Posted - 10/12/2015 :  06:20:02 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I have a whole pile of jalapenos now. I picked them off the plant the neighbor lady left outside to freeze. I had given her a cherry tomato and hungarian wax pepper plants...she let them die, so I gave her a plum tomato plant and jalapeno and she did not take care of those either.... so when she left them outside I brought them in and never put them back out. Oh well!! I have been doing reading about whether to use green or red jalapenos. I will use both. I think I will get some cream cheese and sausage to do stuffed jalapenos. I do not get into bacon so I will just do the cream cheese and sausage. I have a grocery store in town where they make their own sausage and it is really tasty and not too greasy.

I got Perdue chicken legs at $.48 per lb. at Walmart. I bought the whole bag and froze them. 10 lbs. of Perdue chicken legs for $4.80. WOW!!
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/12/2015 :  12:22:04 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Id do the same. Its frustrating when we have spent our time nurturing plants only to have those we give them to, let them die.I gave my neighbor lady peony bulbs that I had separated just to give to her since she wanted some. Her sisters were planting next to the house flower area. That poor peony remained in the pot along the side of her garage,and never was planted, consequently, it died. Like you, had the plant remained in our care, theyd be flourishing and producing. Arent the red jalapenos supposedly warmer than the green ones? Using sausage sounds yummy, and a lot less greasy, even though I bake mine on cooling racks set above another foil lined pan to catch the grease.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1634 Posts

Posted - 10/12/2015 :  12:57:24 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I think the red and green mix well. They are pretty. I read they are milder but I will find out soon enough.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/13/2015 :  07:07:52 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Personally, Ive never tried the reds, but my son had just told us about an incident in which he was given a green jalapeno which he was told was mild, but was hot. Then given a red one which he was told was not hot, but was hotter than the green. Im not a fan of HOT or real spicy foods to say.
You mentioned you purchased the 10# bag of leg quarters from Walmart for $4.80. Were the legs huge? Of the 9 bags we purchased, 7 bags contained HUGE leg quarters, while the other two bags by another company, contained normal sized legs which were much easier to can up as they didnt have to be cut up, other than to separate the thigh from the leg. I would have to say the huge legs came off chickens weighing a good 6-7#. I packed them in half gallon jars, and had a heck of a time getting them in, as the thighs were so big I had to halve them. Theyll be used for soups, or in making dog food, and at $3.80 a bag thats cheap food.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 10/13/2015 :  11:40:54 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
A jalapeno's heat is not determined by the color. It is determined by the soil in which it is grown. If the peppers are left on the plant longer, they turn red. You can pick them when they are green or when they are red. Like bell peppers, the meat of the pepper becomes a bit more sweet the longer it stays on the plant, but heat is found in the oil, most of which is stored in the seeds. You can reduce the amount of heat in a dish by removing the seeds before cooking--or increase the heat by using all the seeds. The color of the pepper, however, will mostly change the appearance of the dish and only subtly affect the taste.

The peony may come back if you go ahead and put it in the ground. It won't hurt to see if it comes up next year. Sometimes a root is dead. Sometimes it is conserving its energy for a better growing circumstance.

While I love pumpkin pie, I actually prefer squash pie. Make it exactly as you would the pumpkin. I don't think you will be disappointed. Squash takes up less space in the garden, so Grandma used it instead. No pureeing, though. Just patient cooking it down to a mush and using a potato masher--and in later years a mixer.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1634 Posts

Posted - 10/13/2015 :  1:41:00 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne posted again.... Thanks for the tips about jalapenos!! You are making me hungry.....>>>> squash pie.... sounds yummy. I will try that this year. What kind of squash is good in pie please? I like buttercup the best. How about buttercup and butternut pie? Do I bake the squashes first and then put it in the shell?
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/13/2015 :  4:55:44 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Its too late for the peony Jnanne, she threw the pot and all this spring before I noticed it gone.
Seems we learned something McBarb, nor I knew. Thanks for the tip.
I have heard of squash pie, and wondered about its similarity to pumpkin in taste. Reading other sites and the overall positive reaction to squash pie as absolutely wonderful, its had me curious. Why, do you say to not puree it? Im not so sure Kurt would eat it that way, unless it isnt noticeably different in texture.Im thinking it worth a try though! I dont remember if I just cut the squash and jammed it in the jars when I canned it, or if I added any water. I would hope, if I used water in the process, all Id have to do is cook it down, am I right?
McBarb, from what Ive read online both varieties are excellent to make pumpkin pie (butternut or buttercup). My son from upnorth made pie using both, and loved them.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 10/13/2015 :  7:14:38 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Grandma used butternut most frequently, although any of the winter squash will work. I really like acorn squash in a pie, too.

I said don't puree, just because Grandma didn't have the new-fangled equipment to puree. And really, if you cook it down you really don't need to. However, if you want the texture to be more smooth than what cooking it down and mashing it gives you, I don't see anything wrong with pureeing. It is just not a necessary step for a great pie.

And I found years ago that if I cut the squash in half, then turn it cut-side down in a little water and bake it or microwave it to soften it, it is much easier to pare. Then you can cut it into chunks and cook it down in a large pot.

My favorite recipe is the one on the Libby's can--except I increase the spices by a lot and add a few extras--love cardamon in pumpkin and in squash pies. Cinnamon, ginger, allspice, nutmeg, clove, mace, and anise all make their way into these pies sometimes.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/14/2015 :  08:57:52 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Excellent information Jnanne. It gives us options to preparing squash for pie making. I too, really like the Libbys recipe with a couple adjustments. My former MIL always used half white sugar and half light brown sugar to equal the one-and-a-half cups sugar the recipe calls for in her pies, and used 2% milk instead of condensed milk, and also a little extra clove, which I do also. Im definitely going to try making pie using the butternut squash. Ive got 52 butternut, and buttercup yet to do something with, but will bake some and can it for future use in pie, and baby food. Ihave a new great grandchild born recently, and the parents want all natural food for the little one. My grandson brought me a mess of small jars to be used. Also, for those that might not know the easy way to peel a fresh squash,just place it in the microwave for 3 minutes, and then peel it. Takes the chore out of doing it.Its then ready to halve, quarter, or slice to freeze. For making the pie Im going to do as you recommend though by baking it in the oven first, as it should be easier to just scoop it out. Now, Im anxious to give this pie a try. Thank you
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1634 Posts

Posted - 10/15/2015 :  06:22:08 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy and Jnanne... you both were talking about a mandolin. If I had one of those could I slice potatoes real thin to make potato chips?
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1634 Posts

Posted - 10/15/2015 :  07:20:08 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I spelled it wrong. Mandoline is the slicing thing. I did a search and will read previous posts too. I think I should get one. I need another toy for the kitchen!!!!!
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/15/2015 :  07:31:37 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Yes McBarb you could. Not having much invested gave me the opportunity to find out if Id make use of it, or not. That cheap little thing has 5 plastic reversible inserts to accommodate various cuts and vegetables,with potato slices in two different thicknesses (youll want to use the thinnest). It WORKS great for chips. Mind you, be VERY careful using a mandolin, because its very easy to forget how fast it works, and easy to clip off the end of your finger without realizing it! I looked online for the one I purchased, and its still available for sale for $5.99 new. Its called 7-in-1 Mandolin slicer/Grater. Google it. Its well enough made for occasional use, and possibly be all youd need. For making potato chips, I use peanut oil to fry them in,or coconut oil, or bake the chips. Again Google how to, and decide which way you want to try. Theyre tasty.
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BCheatam
Star Contributor

IN
USA
290 Posts

Posted - 10/15/2015 :  12:40:59 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I love to read all this canning information. Just curious, what do you do with zuccinni or yellow squash? It's too watery to can, isn't it?

Silver Certified Mystery Shopper & Auditor in Central and Southern Indiana.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 10/15/2015 :  1:23:28 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Regarding the chips, I use all kinds of veggies, slice very thin, spray with Pam, and bake in a low oven. I like the regular, original Canola Oil spray, but I guess others will work. There are many varieties of potato and my family loves the Yukon Gold, blue, sweet, and red better than the traditional Idaho or other white spuds.

Regarding summer squash: Fannie Farmer is my go-to reference for all things canning. Here's what "she" says:

Allow 2-4 pounds for each quart jar. Wash squash thoroughly, but do not peel it. Cut into 1/4-inch slices and boil for 3 minutes. Pack into clean, hot jars, add 1/2 teaspoon salt for each pint, and cover with the boiling water, leaving 1-inch headspace. Close the jars and process at 10 pounds pressure in a steam-pressure canner, allowing 30 minutes for pint jars and 40 minutes for quarts.

Personally, I prefer frozen summer squash. cut into 1/4-inch slices. blanch 2-3 minutes. submerse in an ice bath. drain. freeze for use in soups, stews, or baking. And whether canning or freezing, I hate the taste of salt, so I leave it out.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/15/2015 :  2:00:19 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Bcheatam, it really comes down to preference. If you plan on using zucchini for baking, then just grate it, and place in 1 qt freezer bags (1qt is enough to make 2 batches of bread). If you dont make that many loaves or, need less at one time, Id use the Snack bags which hold 1 cup. Make sure air is out of bag, close, then place each baggie in 1 qt freezer bags which will hold 4 bags, and use as your recipe calls for.
Unlike Jnanne, I remove the skin, cut squash into chunks to fit in jar tightly,cover with hot water,with or without salt,remove air bubbles,add lid/rings,then process in pressure canner for the same amount of time as Jnanne suggested. My former MIL always did it this way as squash cooks while the pressure is building up, continues while pressure is set, and right through cool down. It works for me.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 10/15/2015 :  5:38:06 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I recommend following Judy's canning advice. She has more experience and more recent experience at canning than I do. While Grandma canned a lot, outside of jams and jellies, I never really did much canning. Planting, weeding, harvesting, cooking, and freezing are more my bag!

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/17/2015 :  09:39:21 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
BCheatam, I forgot to address your question regarding squash. I posted in an earlier post how to quickly, and easily peel squash by placing each in the microwave for 3 minutes. Once halved, and seeds removed, they can be frozen in packages for the desired servings needed for use. I use my vacuum sealer. Ive got slices, and chunks for other uses also frozen. Preparation is the same as if the skin were still on depending on how you want to use it. Zucchini can be grated with the skin on, or off, or be frozen leaving the skin on, but halved and seeded, and sliced. Also, if you want to use it for baking cakes, cookies, etc., as I suggested. If youre intending on using zucchini in casseroles, etc., cut into the cuts youll use, and package in amounts normally needed for your favorite recipes. Personally, I dont feel freezer bags are thick enough to keep foods any longer than 3-6 months, and always double bag, and remove as much air as possible to prevent freezer burn. Anyone that home cans loves going to the freezer, or canning shelves for quick meals. SAVES a LOT on grocery spending also.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 10/17/2015 :  5:35:38 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
yeah, it saves a lot. But even better, it tastes more wonderful than anything you can buy at the store.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/18/2015 :  12:24:41 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
AND, absolutely NO chemicals! I just finished canning up the last 30# of chicken. Happy that job is over. I didnt have a choice, as Kurt came home last night with 75# of frozen venison that needed space in the deep freezer. So Im not done canning yet! The majority will be made into dog food mixed with chicken,along with home canned vegetables, and then canned up for shelf placement. Ill can the remainder for future dog food making. Ive still got those squash to do,plus, a slew of baby carrots yet to tackle. The only good part about the carrot job, they can be canned whole.
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