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 Gardening: Grow your own herbs and veggies
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1642 Posts

Posted - 10/19/2015 :  10:47:46 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I have never canned and never will. My grandmother used to can and put things down in the basement where it was cool. My mother used to can too. She also used to make pickles. I do not do that either. I have frozen veggies such as peppers. One year I made tomato sauce and put it in freezer bags. I prefer to share with friends and family when I have too much for just me.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/19/2015 :  6:16:01 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
I dont blame you for not canning, especially for one person. Home canning isnt for everyone. I just happen to love doing it, and get great pleasure sharing with neighbors, family, and strangers in need when I see someone has posted an ad for help. Guaranteed, if it were just me Id can minimal amounts for myself to save money, and not have added chemicals in my food. Neither Kurt, nor I eat venison per say, but the dog loves it in her food mixture.(Ive only been making my own dog food for 8 yrs, and that came about when I worked at a meat processing company one season. I saw diseased animal parts, gangrene/cancer infested, puss, human blood from the meat cutter who was on blood thinners, tobacco chew, and even the mucus from the men blowing their noses into the barrels).THAT did it for me. My x-hubby,and the boys are hunters and fisherman, and all deer hunt. They process their venison into vennie sticks, sausage, vennie hot dogs, and jerky which they share with us. Now, that we do love, as youd never know it was made from deer meat. They also share their fish with us-yummy! EVERYTHING I make is made in large batches(soups,chili,stews, pies, cakes,cookies,donuts, you name it) and shared. All the work is a trade off, and helps us all cut our grocery bills bigtime.
McBarb, you do a very good job with what you have to work with. No outside garden to tend, yet, you are determined to plant anything you can get your little fingers on, inside. You enjoy the flowers, and veggies youve cared for lovingly, and fits your need to grow something. You are a determined soul that doesnt give up. I enjoy your comments on how one thing dies,and the other is flourishing, or youve planted another under the grow light, and are watching as it grows. You make my day many times describing your small pleasures, even getting a single jalapeno to enjoy in some concoction youve made for dinner.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/28/2015 :  1:39:27 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne, how many months out of the year are you able to plant produce? Your winter season seems to have decent temeratures, but does it get warm enough? I am curious.
I am finishing up with the squash. It feels like thats all Ive been doing lately. Ive baked, pureed and frozen 52 buttercup and butternut in 3 1/2 cup measurements which will make two pies each. I like the smell of the butternut a lot better than the buttercup when its pureed, although, the color is lighter in the butternut. A little thin, but much better than the thick buttercup. Its been a job! My Grandson brought over an assortment of squash he wants frozen in 1 cup plastic baggies, so that I still have to get at.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3045 Posts

Posted - 11/01/2015 :  4:25:29 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Many gardeners down here plant year-round. Rip out something as it dies back and replace it quickly with something else. Right now peas, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, onions seem to be doing well for those putting in winter beds.

If you buy starters or seeds that are meant for the region, it is usually successful--at least for something, if not everything you plant each season. The unusual cold and snow messed up some people a couple of years ago, but those who erected shelters over their gardens did just fine. Build a wooden support/shell and cover it with clearish plastic. The sun warms the veggies and the plastic keeps the heat in. When the weather warms up you roll back the plastic. When frost threatens, you cover again.

When we have decent rain, this state it green and full of flowers of some kind all year.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1642 Posts

Posted - 11/03/2015 :  07:48:48 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I am signed up with Burpee to get emails about sales etc. I got an email from them this morning to enter a product giveaway. I entered and no purchase necessary.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/06/2015 :  06:12:10 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
I made my first two pumpkin pies using the home prepared buttercup squash. It is delicious, and tastes no different than the pie using Libby's canned pumpkin, which I used the recipe I had removed from a can long ago, to make these. I checked the large can content weight (29 ounces), and packaged that amount (3 and 1/3 cups) in freezer bags, which would make 2 pies. After mixing all together, and filling two pie shells, there was approx. 2 cups leftover. With the remainder I found a recipe for pumpkin bars, reduced the flour content to 1 cup, added one-half teaspoon of baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda,mixed together, and poured into an 9x9" baking dish. Baked for 35 minutes. I managed to kill 2 birds with one stone, and got 2 desserts. There was no different in consistency of batter in the pies, smooth as canned version. I would highly recommend trying these if you have extra squash you dont know what to do with. Easy too.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/17/2015 :  09:26:04 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
I finally dug up the carrots planted here at the house, and got those canned up. they were real nice shorties, perfect for canning whole. I was surprised to get 40 pints. I also finished canning up the venison,grand total 35 qt, plus, I made jerky and got 7#. All will be used to make dog food, with the jerky used as treats. Kurt said his Dad has another 25-35# of frozen venison for me to can up. I was hoping to put the canners and empty jars away, but that isnt about to happen yet.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3045 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2015 :  07:53:01 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Sounds like once you get the wheat to the mill for grinding and the sugar beets processed you'll just need to keep the sour dough starter alive and the cow milked and you won't need to go to the grocery store for anything in 2016! You've certainly worked hard this year. Time for a break...

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2015 :  08:48:37 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
lol. Not too sure about that one. Even though its been a lot of work canning, if it hadnt for been Kurts hard work in the garden, wed have nothing. It has paid off in reducing the needs at the grocery store. For the two of us I used to spend $400 a month, now I spend less than $100. That works for me.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1642 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2015 :  4:51:13 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy, have you decided what to do for your soil with the Juglon?
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2015 :  3:30:45 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
There really isnt much that can be done to correct the soil other than dig up every last root from the walnut trees that were cut down, and there were a lot of them. As the roots rot it will make the soil even worse. With that in mind, I am going to have Kurt plant all the tomatoes here at the house, and I will tend to them. If there isnt enough room right close to the house, there is plenty of room left to plant in the garden hes made for the strawberries and blueberries.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1642 Posts

Posted - 11/22/2015 :  06:10:33 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Plants Observed to Be Tolerant to Juglone
Vegetables: lima bean; snap bean; beet; carrot; corn;
melon; onion; parsnip; squash

Hey, Judy the above is a copy of paste from a search I did. Did you consider growing any of the vegetables listed above? I would if I were you. Go for it Judy, try carrots again. Fresh beets are delightful!! Snap beans are so incredibly easy to grow and yummy!!! You can do 2 growings of snap beans. They yield in about 60 days. What do you say Judy?
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/22/2015 :  09:00:24 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Everything other than the parsnip, lima bean, and beets were planted. Our string beans did fantastic even though we didnt plant a second crop, Ive got more beans than I know what to do with also. You might remember the carrots did extremely well as I canned up waaaay too many, and wont have to plant them next spring. Potatoes, tomatoes, and corn did not do so well. In our case, the garden hadnt been used for many years, in that time many walnut trees sprung up over the years and took over the garden. Unbeknownst at the time to us the soil was tainted by juglone from those trees, and then made worse when cutting them down and not removing the extensive root system. Our onions did very well this year, which I chopped, and froze all. Kurts Dad told Kurt to plant rye to replace the nutrients lost in the soil, and that I assume will be tilled under in the spring, and thats where anything not affected by the juglone will be planted, while those veggies that will be affected will be moved to a new area further away from the affected soil. Im also planning on planting all the tomatoes here at the house which I will maintain, and have easy access for eating and canning. I WISH spring was here! Kind of hard tro think about gardening when its so darn cold out up here.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1642 Posts

Posted - 11/24/2015 :  08:04:16 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Spring? You are too funny! You can definitely plant twice for beans!! Carrots last a long time and you can dig them up on the winter too. You can freeze or can beans too....if you want to. Try talking to the cooperative extension in your area as to what else you can plant in the Juglone tainted soil. You may be pleasantly surprised.

My neighbors here are not going to be pleasantly surprised next spring as I might buy a greenhouse and leave it locked at all times!!!!!!!!
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/24/2015 :  09:18:14 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
We didnt plant a second crop of beans because I had already canned up a ton of them, as well as carrots. The only vegetables I freeze are corn, broccoli, and cauliflower. We dont care for the texture and taste of any other vegetable thats been frozen. I prefer to can things up just in case the electricity goes out. Id hate to lose a lot of good food items.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3045 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2015 :  7:36:28 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
While some root veggies are still good into the winter, in some areas you really can't dig them up once the ground is frozen hard. At least not easily!

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/29/2015 :  10:44:16 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Up here, to dig out veggies left in the ground youd need a jack hammer as the ground is frozen solid.Thankfully, everything is out of the ground and canned up. I still wish it was spring!
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 12/11/2015 :  07:45:32 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Some of our garden seed arrived yesterday. The big sales have begun with the arrival of seed catalogs.Jnanne, have you taken advantage of your weather to plant anything?
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1642 Posts

Posted - 12/11/2015 :  7:45:03 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I discovered that my pepper seeds sprouted after all!! I planted 1 hungarian wax pepper, 2 Burpee jalapeno peppers, some seeds I got from a jalapeno plant I grew last summer, 2 Burpee sweet California Wonder peppers and 4 cubanelle pepps. I had planted the seeds 11/28. I called Burpee and sent them an email asking if I can grow plants in the winter as I wanted to know what they would say about it. Most people say not to plant seeds in the winter. Anyways, Burpee said to grow the peppers mid March for where I live. I had sprayed water on the seeds and had them covered with plastic sandwich bags. I took them away from the heat and gave up on the project. I was working in the kitchen tonight putting groceries away and thought.... hmmm, I wonder if the seeds came up. They sure did!! I will be careful and keep them in the sun now and keep them warm to see what they will do now. I do not expect them to grow like they would in the summer but they look pretty healthy.

Weather here has been heavenly. I took my winter coat off 4 days now. It has been in the high 40's. Sunny today and breezy. I have been outside a lot this winter.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 12/12/2015 :  10:33:27 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
At least youre getting sun where you are to grow your plants. Weve had few and far between sights of it here. Hope your peppers turn out well for you.
The gloomy weather has made me get busy making a variety of soups (bean w/bacon, chili, and chicken vegetable)that got canned up for future use. Ive also been doing some serious baking (pies, bars, cookies and quick breads), thats now in the freezer. Ive got three pans of pumpkin bars in the oven as I type. Ill use that pumpkin up one way, or the other!
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