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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3047 Posts

Posted - 03/25/2014 :  06:44:41 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
No, I don't believe so. However, daisies are part of the mum/marigold clan. Check the shape of the leaves. If they are similar to marigolds, they may be in the same family.

And it won't hurt to wait and see if the bulbs survived--although this past winter was so much colder than usual that it isn't as likely. We lost quite a few plants down here that have lived outdoors year round for years, such as foxtail fern, azaelias, crepe myrtle, and althea.

Dahlias are another bulb that don't like cold weather. Bring them in before the first frost. If they are in pots it makes it easier to just move the pots to the basement or garage (if it is attached and steals some of the warmth from the house so it stays above freezing.

Bulbs that tolerate the cold include most lilies, tulips, hyacinth, anemone, crocus, iris, daffodils, jonquil (I've never figured out if those are two words for the same plant or two very similar plants).

Jnanne
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 04/02/2014 :  6:51:48 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
The seeds are doing great!! ~ I have yellow pear tomatoes, Cherokee purple tomatoes, basil, green bouquet basil, perennial hollyhocks, red nasturtiums, celosias and cherry tomatoes. I forgot I am growing Grannys Nightcap.. (columbine) which is a perennial.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3047 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2014 :  11:13:45 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I was pleased to discover that some of the foxtail ferns are putting up new shoots. The ones in the ground, anyway. The ones hanging in planters along the fence probably won't return, as their roots were not as protected. We'll be re-planting those with I don't know what, yet.

One hibiscus (the beautiful, deep-red one!) isn't budding, one althea has done nothing, and a few of the azaelias are definitely dead. However, the dandelions, creeping charlie, white clover, and friends all seemed to have made it through the winter and are thick, healthy, and happy!

Jnanne
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 04/06/2014 :  11:27:22 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne, did you tell me last fall how to grow Jalapenos? Weve got several started now under grow lights. What Im wondering is, will they grow good in black dirt? How about with other vegetables in the area? As I mentioned before were going to plant a large garden at my former in-laws farm. The garden hasn't been used for years, but Im sure the soil will be great for most other veggies, but not sure about the peppers. Id appreciate any suggestions from those that have grown them.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3047 Posts

Posted - 04/06/2014 :  5:31:25 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
The peppers will grow great in any soil, and you'll get large ones with thick, meaty walls in dark loam. If you want them to be hot, you'll do better with more sandy soil. They are native to warm, sandy clime, and in richer soil tend to be more mild. Whatever the soil, it needs to be in an area that drains well. They don't like bog.

Peppers take the same nutrients from the soil as potatoes, tomatoes, and eggplant, because they are all members of the nightshade family. Carrots put those same nutrients into the soil, so they are great companion plants, each giving the other what they need to be healthy. Carrots do much better in the black dirt. I've never had luck growing carrots that I thought were better than grocery produce, so whenever I use a carrot in the kitchen I take the top and poke it in the ground around my tomatoes and peppers, letting them develop pretty, lacy leaves as they feed the soil.

Jnanne
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2014 :  06:19:20 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
My question is... where do I get the sand?

I potted my seedlings for celosia, cleome, regular basil, green bouquet basil, Cherokee Purple tomatoes, cherry and yellow pear tomatoes yesterday. My first planting of seeds died as I left them in the tray too long. I tried green bouquet basil last year and it is a pretty plant for sure!
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2014 :  10:23:29 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
THANK YOU Jnanne! This is new information that WILL be very useful to us. Now, all we have to do is find a better place to plant them so they grow to be HOT. Imight have to try and convince my son to build a planter along the side of the garage to plant them in. You have been most helpful, and I really appreciate it.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3047 Posts

Posted - 04/07/2014 :  4:42:07 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
You can probably pick up sand at Home Depot, Lowe's, or a similar store with a large garden section. Maybe even at Wal-Mart. It comes in bags similar to topsoil, but generally smaller, as sand is more dense. Sometimes you find it with the building materials for sandboxes.

Experiment with the mix. Depending on how rich your soil is, you may want to start out with 20-25% sand mixed in, then adjust next year. Or you may want to do 2-3 different mixes and decide which you like best, or use the peppers for different purposes. You may want a milder pepper in pico de gallo and a hotter one in a batch of chili.

Jnanne
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 04/21/2014 :  05:13:26 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy, sounds like you have weather similar to mine. It is good you started seeds early!! I LOVE to watch them grow. It is a lot more work starting early but very rewarding!! What kind of squash do you grow? I tried squash but had no luck.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 04/21/2014 :  2:35:55 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Weve started a full tray(18) of Acorn squash. I have a question for anyone that can enlighten me. We started 3 large trays of tomatoes, Big Boys and Roma's. The plants are a good foot tall, (if not more) but to me look too spindly. Ive never planted tomatoes from seed, so these look weird to me. They've all had to be transplanted into 6" coconut pots. Ive always bought 6"potted tomatoes that actually looked like tomato plants, these don't seem right to me. If they keep growing as they have been we'll have tomatoes(hopefully)before theyre planted outside. lol. Im going to buy a few tomato plants I know will provide tomatoes, just in case.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3047 Posts

Posted - 04/22/2014 :  06:03:12 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
When you plant them in the ground, remove the leaves from the bottom 1/2-2/3 of the plant and put all that underground. I may seem that only the smaller plant will be above ground and therefore you are making it harder to grow tomatoes, however, what you are doing is allowing the plant to grow roots from all that stem that you buried. And you will have roots almost as strong as the tap root coming from the nodes where the leaves were growing, making your plant much more sturdy and healthy in the long run. This will give you larger fruit and increase the growing season by a few weeks, if the temperature outdoors cooperates.

Just be sure to give plenty of water, daily if possible.

Jnanne
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 04/22/2014 :  3:42:49 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
That's what I thought too, but didn't think of the added benefit of stronger root system and healthier plant aspect. I was unsure because Ive never started tomatoes by seed. Thank you AGAIN, youre a great help AND very knowledgeable. Gosh, I wish the weather would warm up, instead of this one day 70 and the next 50 degree stuff. ONLY in WI can you wear shorts one day, and have snow the next.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1645 Posts

Posted - 04/23/2014 :  06:00:35 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Wow Judy, you will have loads of tomatoes!! What do you do with all of them? Can or make sauce?


I will try to grow acorn squash. I Love it. Theyy have a thread on Wisconsin at garden web forum.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3047 Posts

Posted - 04/23/2014 :  06:17:05 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Some of my most wonderful childhood memories are of gardening with my dad. With so many kids he had lots of labor for the weeding, etc. and he put us to work. Each year we were assigned the complete care of different plants, so that by the time we were in high school we pretty much loved all vegetables. If you got to plant it, weed it, harvest it, and cook it, you had to enjoy eating it, right?

Two acres was a typical size for our gardens, with just about every veggie you can imagine showing up there at one time or another. Super sweet corn became a favorite once it was available. Tomatoes, peppers, onions, beets, and okra were staples.

We also made use of wild crops, such as blackberries and mulberries, that grew on the farm. While I never really developed a love for those fruits because of the seeds--taste is fine, but seeds between the teeth is not--I truly enjoyed going out into the woods and picking them. And I was the only child guaranteed to actually make it back to the house with a considerable amount of fruit. Everyone else ate lots as they picked.

Just wish I could convince my daughter that it is fun to dig in the dirt with me! It's amazing the amount I learned while just enjoying time with Daddy.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 04/23/2014 :  10:56:50 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
McBarb,Im sure some of the tomatoes will go to family for table use. Otherwise, I plan on canning as many tomatoes as possible, along with making a ton of Salsa, that the kid is so good at taking credit for making! My X-husband loves to go to auctions so hes going to look for more canning jars. It seems I never have enough because the family members cant eat up the previous years goods fast enough, and then you always seem to have those you give to that throw the jars away, or keep for their own canning use. Talking about canning, has anyone tried the relatively new re-usable lids Ive seen on the web? Im thinking of buying some just for our own use here at the house.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 04/23/2014 :  11:21:12 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne, My X husband grew up on the farm also, and he spoke about working the garden and going blueberry, and wild berry picking too. I,on the other hand grew up in the city, and didn't know jack about gardening until we got married. You come from a line of hard working farmers that know what it is to really work,unlike us city kids who just opened a can and didn't know where the goods came from. I have one grandson whose wife wont eat home canned goods because she thinks you cant eat that stuff from the ground! Shes not the smartest tool in the toolshed.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3047 Posts

Posted - 04/24/2014 :  05:49:59 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Isn't it sweet of her that she eats the low-quality, less tasty food and leaves the good stuff for everyone else! Good thing for you she doesn't know what she is missing.

One of the most disappointing field trips most of the kids in my family experienced at some point included
--riding the bus to school for attendance so as not to be marked absent
--riding the bus back home
--Daddy showing the class something we saw on a daily basis, whether it was milking the cows, picking the strawberries, currying the horse, etc.
--riding the bus back to school so we didn't get marked as leaving early
--riding the bus back home

Jnanne
Silver certified
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3047 Posts

Posted - 05/05/2014 :  06:28:15 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Well, the gorgeous garden of two weeks ago may be no more. We have a fungus on the tomatoes and squash, which we are trying hard to treat with an anti-fungal spray and are hoping does not spread to other plants. I easily have 50 tomatoes bigger than golf balls, way too green to pick, that may rot on the vine if we don't get this under control. And the squash are dropping the veggies when they reach about 2 inches.

Wish I knew what caused this so we can avoid it in the future. Wonder if it originated in a bag of topsoil?

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 05/06/2014 :  06:00:35 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne,never fails! Just when we get excited at seeing our veggies produce, then look forward to the day we get to enjoy eating them, something happens. Im sorry for your loss. Have you performed a search on the internet for diseases affecting tomatoes? Since Im not a very knowledgeable gardener, the internet is my go-to for most problems or advice. I love the many pictures available that gives me a better view of some of the problem fungus and diseases, plus the cure. I HOPE youre able to save your plants.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 05/06/2014 :  07:16:50 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne, sorry to hear of your dilemma. Hope you don't lose all your plants. Just the thought of losing any of the fruit would make me sick. Have you taken to the internet to locate the various fungus and diseases that tomato plants are susceptible to? Some sites post pictures for easy identification, along with advice as to how to deal with each. Im not a very knowledgeable gardener, so for the most part I rely on the various information provided by experts. Just an idea, but have you considered making a green tomato relish out of the tomatoes, instead of throwing them away? I found a couple of excellent recipes online, one adding a bottle of mustard to, that is super-fantastic to be used on brats, hotdogs and venison hotdogs.
The weather here is just starting to warm up, and still not recommended to start planting tomatoes. Our seedlings are now 3' tall and HAD to be planted in the ground. The soil temp is between 50-55 degrees. I stuck more than half the plant in the ground, removing the lower stems as advised by sites online. According to the weather forecast for the next two weeks our night time temps shouldn't fall below 40 degrees. The garden at Gramma's has grown quite a bit. Its now 120' x 40' My son is going crazy! somehow, I have to find a way to keep him away from the garden centers. He keeps on buying stuff! At home, we removed the river rock from the 70' cement planter bordering the patio where some string beans will be planted this yr in full sun. That gives me sit on a chair and pick access. Last year, I had him cut 4- 50 gallon plastic barrels in half lengthwise that we planted carrots in. They worked so well, this year he cut 6 more barrels to plant in. When your tight for space they work great. Hes got the lawn looking like a golf course and wouldn't til a garden in, so Ive had to make use of anything I could think of. I also transplanted a bunch of shrubs that were next to the house, and asparagus will be put in that area in a couple of weeks. I don't think Ill be complaining about having nothing to do this year!
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