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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/01/2014 :  10:55:56 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
This is the information that our local farm supply had regarding the product, which I then looked on the internet for. The correct name of the product is "Bonide Mosquito Beater". It comes in granule form and also a spray bottle for larger areas that connects to the garden hose. Regular price is under $14.00, and covers 5,000 sq.ft. and lasts 3 weeks rain, or shine. Also, I didnt read the ingredient list on the product. For the first time in 3 yrs my son and family is able to sit outside without getting bit, or eaten up. They live in the middle of the woods, with a big pond within throwing distance from the house,and he swears by this. Youll have to decide whether its something youd use. Im just the messenger.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3049 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2014 :  06:01:16 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Judy. I checked the ingredients and it includes citronella. I'll contact the company and find out whether they recommend I stay away. I figure if it works for an extended time on the bugs, it is likely to be active and bugging me for the same amount of time--but it may be something I could use.

Thanks for the info and I'll do more research.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 07/06/2014 :  04:12:22 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
My acorn squash all died. I do not know why I cannot grow squash but maybe next year. I will have plenty of tomatoes, eggplant and peppers.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/06/2014 :  08:16:10 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
I can only imagine the disappointment you feel. By any chance do you have a soil testing agency in your area? If so, it might be a chance for you to find out what your soil may be lacking, or having too much of, that could cause this problem so you dont experience this again on your next attempt. Up here, there is a small fee ($5) to have the soil tested. We were having the opposite effect here trying to grow of all things radishes. The plant produced beautiful foliage, but not a single radish. The soil was too rich, so we added lime to the soil to bring the ph level down. Thankfully, radishes grow fast and we were able to replant with great success. Its a lot of work gardening, and none of us want to lose a single plant.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3049 Posts

Posted - 07/06/2014 :  2:34:16 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I tease my mother-in-law that she is the impatient gardener. She is always willing to pull out a plant and start over, rather than give it time to do its thing. She is fabulous with orchids--a master in that area--but has much less experience with vegetables and sometimes doesn't get that not all tomato plants have the same length of time from planting to harvesting.

She also despises Miracle Gro, which I have used for years. I have not pointed out that the tomatoes I planted with Miracle Gro are doing much better than the ones she planted. She has decided the problem is that the soil is too heavy, because we used topsoil instead of potting soil. Seems to me all the two-acre gardens we had as a kid would not have thrived in the Illinois black dirt if that were true.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 07/08/2014 :  10:21:11 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I called Burpee garden hotline to ask about powdery mildew on leaves of squash and cukes cuz I have friends that have that. I was told to call my county's cooperative extension on how to deal. I was told to wipe off the leaves and keep the plant from being close to another so it will not spread. It maybe airborn.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/09/2014 :  08:56:31 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
mcBarb, do you have very many squash/cucumber plants that could potentially become affected? Now that youve made me aware of this, Ill have to keep an eye on the plants we have in our garden. I dont know how youd be able to isolate any affected plants, especially when they vine out. I would imagine at that point it might be wise to destroy the plant(s). We have been picking Sugar Snap Peas like crazy and weve been busy freezing them. I kept out enough for supper the other night to saute. Delicious! String beans should be ready tomorrow, so that means drag out the canner. We generally go out to the garden every other day, but now Ill be out there each morning after the dew leaves to pick, and Kurt will go after work to pick remainder. Ill insert a small flag to let him know where I left off. FINALLY! Something I really enjoy doing. Ill be able to get a leg up on the canning while hes at work, and Kurt can freeze the peas when he gets home, now that he knows how.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3049 Posts

Posted - 07/10/2014 :  07:08:14 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy--sounds like lots of fun. I wish we had the space for a big garden, but we really don't. With all the wonderful trees there just isn't enough sunlight to nourish many veggies. We have enough to pick and eat, but not enough to store. Except for the potatoes. Each plant has the potential for 10 lb, and we put in 8 plants. I don't think we'll eat all that the day we harvest!

Jnanne
Silver certified
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 07/10/2014 :  07:32:48 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy, I have no squash plants. If yu do a seach for powdery mildew or mold on squash or cukes, you will see for yourself. It is white spots on the leaves.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/10/2014 :  08:04:03 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne, Oh my gosh a potato plant has that great of producing? If so, Kurt is going to have potatoes to sell! We put in 8-50 ft rows each of reds, russets, early, and I would assume russets that his Father gave to us, but he didnt know what kind they were as they were given to him.Kurt dug up a few hills of reds Sunday, and Id have to guess there was more 10#, but they are the perfect sizes wanted for sauteing (fingerlings), and a bit larger than a golf ball for boiling. Im not particularly crazy for the larger potatoes in this variety. The boiled potatoes were so creamy Kurt thought Id cooked them differently. Also, I wanted to warn you, if you decide to purchase that Mosquito Beater to NOT spray it so it might over spray into your garden area. Kurt sprayed out at the farm, and then noticed a few plants had some wilting. He figures when he sprayed that the wind carried some of it onto those plants. He watered them with rain water, and possibly the water washed some of the oily film off the branches, days later they look a lot better. I think I have cured what is called black tar spot disease on a little silver maple tree that started to grow on its own in a leftover dirt big flower pot last summer. I looked online to see what the spots were, and did as directed for a couple of weeks. Then I applied Sevin dust to the tree. Hey, that stuff is good for anything!That little 3' tree is growing like a weed. Last fall, I decided to try and keep it alive by storing it under a zippered tarp along with my patio furniture and grill.Im glad I did, because I lost several shrubs over the winter due to ice build up under the snow that caused them to starve. Im going to store this little tree again this coming winter,and possibly plant it next summer when its taller. McBarb,we will keep an eye open for those white spots. Thank you for the heads up.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 07/11/2014 :  4:47:14 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Fresh homegrown potatoes are one of favs!! I grew them one year. My friend asked me how they were doing and I told her my taters died. She laughed and told me I had to dig them up ...
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/12/2014 :  05:11:43 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Im wondering, can either you, or Jnanne answer this one. As you know we planted potatoes. Were finding green balls growing on the red potatoes plant limbs. Theyre green, and about the size of marbles.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 07/13/2014 :  3:57:28 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
just a guess but seed balls?
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/13/2014 :  4:35:26 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Impatient as I am, I did a little online searching and found that they ARE seed balls, and are poisonous to pets, and children, until they turn brown. According to other information available, it isnt worth planting the seeds.Im glad to know theyre poisonous as our dog loves to play in the garden, and is always finding a radish, or cherry tomato to put in her mouth and throw in the air to play with. We removed the balls from plants today.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 07/14/2014 :  05:16:53 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I never get bored gardening. It is soooo interesting and rewarding.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/19/2014 :  3:59:16 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Well, EVERY tomato plant (Roma,Better Girl and Big Boy) and green pepper plant are dying, or dead out at the farm garden! At first, we thought it was over spray from that mosquito spray that was causing some of the branches on the plants to wilt. But now, Kurt has determined it is caused from the Walnut trees. There are three or four on the north side of the garden, plus, he cut down a couple more on the south side before planting the garden. The Roma's were just turning colors, and the green pepper plants developed white spots on them. Two days later they were dead. The other tomato plants had many small fruit growing. VERY disappointing! All that work up in smoke. Not all is lost though as we did plant some plants here at the house which will be enough for our own use. Ive been canning string beans, and freezing sugar snap peas like crazy this week, besides dealing with the eye issue.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2014 :  10:59:13 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy, are you sure it was the walnut trees? I would find out if you can so you can avoid this happening again. Do you want to call someone?? Try your local cooperative extension and ask them!! I am totally sorry for your loss. I am so glad you have the beans and peas!! Can you plant more peas? I think they might grow very well. You have time Judy. You would have to want to first.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1689 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2014 :  11:05:21 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
this is a copy and paste form gardenweb.com/forum:

Follow-Up Postings:



o RE: Tomatoes that grow around walnut trees

clip this post email this post what is this?
see most clipped and recent clippings

•Posted by yardenman z7 MD (My Page) on Sun, Aug 12, 07 at 23:29



If it is a black walnut tree, there is a toxicity concern. Black walnut trees produce a toxic material that can injure or kill tomatoes, potatoes, peppers and eggplant. I doubt that any varieties are safe from it.
If you can't get any safe distance from black walnuts (I would guess 50-100% further than the tree drip line), you might consider a raised bed (and I mean raised right off the ground) as in a really deep solid box above ground.








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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/20/2014 :  11:53:56 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the suggestions, but the plants are deader than doornails! And yes, they are black walnut trees. We first noticed just a few plants showing signs of wilting that my son attributed to using Mosquito Beater spray that may have come into contact with them from the wind. There are several rows of potatoes that havent shown any sign of wilting/dying, so I will make the call to the county extension office tomorrow. Next year, he plans on planting in a different area of the garden. He has a huge section where cucumbers and squash are growing this yr far away from those trees and soil. Its really sad to lose all those plants, but we live and learn.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 07/23/2014 :  11:38:52 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
McBarb, I made the call to the county extension office only to learn there is absolutely nothing that can be done to save any of the plants growing in the garden affected by this wilt. I went out to the garden yesterday to pick string beans, and noticed some of the potato plants are dying,as well as the sugar snap peas. Some of the green bean plants are also showing signs, with some dead. Thank goodness this is farm property so planting next year shouldnt be a problem because theres numerous open areas to choose from. Ive canned almost 60 qts of string beans,with a couple more pickings left if the plants last that long. Ive also frozen 4 pounds of sugar snap peas, so I know were set. but any hopes of Kurt selling the extra is out the window. WE began making Garlic dill pickles late yesterday afternoon, after my canning beans all day. Kurt has some favorites he got recipes from friends he wants made, so WE will make 14 qts of each variety. I was HOPING he planned on doing the work himself, but guess I was dreaming. I did manage to get him to fill the jars with the cukes, dill, and garlic, while I made the brine, and then processed in canner. I figured if I was going to miss my favorite tv shows, so was he! Like I mentioned before, if he plans on taking credit for things Ive made, hes darn well going to work for the praise by doing, and learning this year.
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