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 Looking for Salsa recipes
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2013 :  06:49:37 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
My garden is all done and Im sitting on a bunch of tomatoes that Im debating on what to do with. Ive made a couple different recipes that Ive canned up for Salsa, but am looking for "tried and true" favorites. Ive canned tomatoes in about every which way I could find, but would enjoy trying your favorite recipe. I also purchased at the grocery store two of those prepackaged Salsa Mixes, but had to doctor them up. One had a very strong smell and taste of Cilantro, I had to add a quart of finely chopped, skinned tomatoes, more green pepper, corn, black beans, and onions to make it edible. Care to share your favorite??

MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1634 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2013 :  4:51:26 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
I just made some salsa from chopped salsa tomatoes, chopped jalapeno, lime juice, chopped fresh parsley (could not find cilantro) , chopped scallions, chopped garlic, s & p. It was yummy!!
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/08/2013 :  1:46:44 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
I managed to find some excellent Salsa recipes online. So far, Ive canned up 6 different kinds with different seasonings. Everything from inferno hot that my son loves, to mildly warm for us that prefer just a little heat. I also was given a "favorite" recipe for Jalapeno relish to be used on hamburgers, and hot dogs, and pickled jalapeno's. Ive put a heck of a dent in the grocery bag of Jalapeno peppers that were given to us. Today I used up the remaining by making Jalapeno poppers. Yummy! Now, the friend is sending MORE peppers which will get blanched, and frozen for future use. In case you didn't know how to tell the difference between a HOT pepper, and a mild one, if the stem is curled, its hot. If the stem is straight, its mild.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 11/04/2013 :  06:11:23 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy--I wash and dry jalapenos, chilis, and other small peppers, then toss them together in a zipper freezer bag. When I want to add one or two to chili, pico do gallo, or a roast I just grab one from the bag, remove the stem and seeds, and cut it up. I never worry about blanching and it hasn't affected the flavor.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/04/2013 :  5:21:12 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
McBarb, that is d-e-l-i-c-i-o-u-s! We spread it on soft tortilla shells and wrap it up to eat. Now theres something really good.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/04/2013 :  5:34:49 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Having removed the seeds and membrane,I took the recommendations that I found online to blanch the peppers in hot water, not boiling, for 3 minutes. Then laid them out on paper towels to dry before laying them out in rows in a bag to vacuum seal, as I want to use them for jalepano poppers over the winter months. I take it, you've had good luck freezing them whole,sounds like a good idea. Next year, I definitely plan on planting my own jalepeno plants, which I will then try your recommendation. My son, says he doesn't blanch his peppers either.Had I known, I wouldn't have bothered.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 11/05/2013 :  06:06:54 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
So many foods lose flavor if not blanched, but I haven't had that problem with small peppers. They don't get soggy like frozen bell peppers, either.

If you want the peppers you grow to be hot, add a little sand to the soil when you plant. You may want to do this in large pots so as not to mess up the garden soil for other plants in future years.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/06/2013 :  08:34:55 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne, I appreciate the excellent tips. I didn't know planting peppers in the garden would mess up the soil. I WILL remember that when planting next year. Thank you.
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/06/2013 :  08:37:48 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne, I appreciate the excellent tips. I didn't know planting peppers in the garden would mess up the soil. I WILL remember that when planting next year. Thank you.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1634 Posts

Posted - 11/09/2013 :  06:21:44 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by JudyK

McBarb, that is d-e-l-i-c-i-o-u-s! We spread it on soft tortilla shells and wrap it up to eat. Now theres something really good.



I agree Judy.. there is not much of anything better (and healthier!!) than homemade salsa.
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LisaMSpinale
Apprentice

St. Paul, MN
USA
2 Posts

Posted - 11/09/2013 :  1:15:52 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Try roasting your tomatoes in the oven along with a sweet onion, a head of garlic (the top cut off and drizzled w/olive oil, then wrapped in foil) and a few peppers of whatever heat you prefer (I do a red bell pepper along with three of four others). Roast til the skins are blistering to black (but don't burn the garlic!). Peel off the skins (easy way to do this is put them in a plastic grocery bag til just cool enough to handle).

I then put everything in my blender and pulse. The garlic will squeeze out of its individual little 'pods' from the head. I like my salsa on the smoother side. I will add a bit of lime juice and lime zest, and sometimes a bit of sugar. YUM!

Lisa
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 11/13/2013 :  06:23:59 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Judy--the peppers don't mess up the garden--the sand does. If you are concerned that mixing sand into the soil in order to encourage hotter peppers may cause a problem for growing different veggies in future years, then plant the hot peppers in pots where you can keep the sandy soil separate from the rest of the garden.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/16/2013 :  09:20:57 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Jnanne,the friend that gave me that grocery bag full of jalapenos said he grew his plants in very rich soil in his garden, and all his peppers turned out to be HOTTER than blazes, and all were 3-5 inches long, and plump. Im going to plant mine next year in big pots as you suggested, so as to not take up space in my little garden. Im also going to try using sandy soil in a few pots, and a richer soil in the others just to see if there is a difference. I hope I have as good of luck as he, although not as many peppers. He had over 6 five gallon pails from 12 plants. That averages out to be a half a bushel from each plant!
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 11/18/2013 :  05:54:32 AM  Reply  Reply with Quote
wow--that's a lot of peppers. I like all temps of peppers, so am happy with whatever my garden produces, but I always grow the peppers in pots. With the raised beds to keep the dogs out, there's limited space in the garden so whatever will grow in pots helps out.

I also tuck carrot tops around the tomato plants. You don't get to eat any carrots from that, but as the tops grow they put nutrients into the soil that the tomatoes need. I've never been able to grow carrots that I thought were tasty enough to bypass the ones at the store (save my space for things that taste better than store-bought), but growing carrots along with the tomatoes is good for each. They each return to the soil the nutrients that the other needs.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2013 :  06:40:55 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
That WAS a lot of peppers for me too, that's why I was looking for good salsa recipes. I didn't have the heart to throw them out. This year was the first year I had huge tomato plants. Each one stood 5-6 feet tall and were loaded with big tomatoes. A friend who always has a super garden told me to buy bags of manure, and then dig a good sized hole for the plant, and place about 2-3# of manure in each hole before placing the plant. I made my own tomato cages, cut in varying heights not knowing how big to expect them to grow. The cages I made cutting the wire using the width of the roll as the height worked the best to support them, and the plants still grew over the tops. I used plastic cable ties to join the sides together, then kind of weaved two bamboo support stakes in each cage to give added support as they grew larger. The cages I had cut shorter, I ended up adding more wire and affixed with cable ties to add more height. Next year, I plan on buying another roll of that wire and make all tall cages. The plants looked more like trees they were so pretty. I was also told to trim the new plants lowest branches off, and any little ones growing in between v-branches, as they are just bleeders, and don't produce tomatoes. This was a first for me, as Id never had great success with the soil we have here for planting. The twelve plants I planted were ALL in an area of about 5' x 6' which meant they were very crowded, yet, I was still able to reach in from all sides to pick since all the branches were contained in an upright position. Im really looking forward to next spring now.
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Jnanne
Star Contributor

LA
USA
3043 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2013 :  4:20:57 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
Sounds like you got some great advice. Also, when you plant, put approximately 2/3 of the stem underground to increase the root structure and make for a stronger vine. Sucker the plant first--remove the leaves and branches that will go underground and roots will form where they were.

Jnanne
Silver certified
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2013 :  12:58:11 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Im am so happy for your tips. Yes, you are absolutely right! I did that, and the stems grew to 2" in diameter, and the branches a healthy 1-2" thick and were able to support the heavy laden fruit. I know where Im going for advice...right here in Volition!
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2013 :  1:05:58 PM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
I didn't stop at removing those leaves and branches, as I had almost a foot of space between the lowest branch and the ground, and still didn't have any tomatoes hanging on the ground. As the branches grew, I moved the lower branches over into the plant next to them so they were fully supported. Im no gardener, but space was VERY limited, so I did what I could with what I had with great results.
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MCBarb
Star Contributor

USA
1634 Posts

Posted - 10/20/2015 :  6:03:56 PM  Reply  Reply with Quote
The best salsa I ever made had an avocado chopped up in it.... plus chopped salsa tomatoes, chopped jalapeno, lime juice, chopped fresh parsley (could not find cilantro) , chopped scallions, chopped garlic, s & p. It was yummy!!
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JudyK
Star Contributor

Eau Claire, WI. 54703-1729
USA
1349 Posts

Posted - 10/25/2015 :  09:06:35 AM  Send JudyK an AOL message  Reply  Reply with Quote
Im sure your salsa tasted just as good without the use of cilantro. It is purchased in the produce aisle in a bunch, and for the amount you get it doesnt make sense to purchase it unless youll be using a lot of it. The recipes I found called for more than youd want in them. I had to dilute my recipe because it was overpoweringly strong and made it inedible. Thats all you tasted.IF you should decide to make something again that calls for cilantro, I recommend using a very minimal amount, and then add a bit more until you get the desired flavor.
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